Events

  • Fri
    30
    Jan
    2015
    Lancaster University, FASS Building, Meeting Room 2-3

    On Friday 30th January 2015, The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science is organizing a seminar with a series of talks on Chinese linguistics from both international and Lancaster University speakers. The seminar will take place at Lancaster University, FASS Building, Meeting Room 2-3. All are welcome to attend. The full programme can be found below:

    Time

    Speaker

    Affiliation

    Title of talk

    13.00 – 13.30

    Hongyin Tao

    University of California Los Angeles

    Corpus Linguistics and Null Elements

    13.30 – 14.00

    Yueguo Gu

    The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

    Multimodal corpus linguistics approach to child language development

    14.00 – 14.30

    Andrew Hardie

    Lancaster University

    Multidimensional analysis for the masses

    14.30 – 15.00

    Tea break

     

     

    15.00 – 15.30

    Hai Xu

    Guangdong University of Foreign Studies

    Building a Learner Corpus of Chinese: A Preliminary Report

    15.30 – 16.00

    Paul Rayson and Scott Piao

    Lancaster University

    Semantic tagging in Chinese

    16.00 – 16.30

    Jiajin Xu

    Beijing Foreign Studies University

    Chinese Corpus Torch Relay: From LCMC to ToRCH2009

    16.30 – 17.00

    Vittorio Tantucci

    Lancaster University

    The anti-resultative aktionsart of the Mandarin V- guo construction as a lexical source of evidentiality: A corpus-based study.

  • Wed
    27
    May
    2015
    Sun
    31
    May
    2015
    Trier

    Words, words, words – corpora and lexis

    The following scholars have far confirmed their participation in the conference as plenary speakers:

    • Kate Burridge, Monash University 
    • Thomas Herbst, Erlangen University
    • Graeme Trousdale, Edinburgh University
    • Edmund Weiner, Oxford University / OED

    The conference will follow the regular ICAME format: On Wednesday afternoon, we will start with one or several pre-conference workshops, and the day will end with a first plenary and a reception at the "Electoral Palace" (Kurfürstliches Palais) - one of the most beautiful rococo palaces in the world. On Friday afternoon, the conference excursion will take us to Bernkastel and its surroundings, and will of course also include a boat trip. The conference will end at lunchtime on Sunday.

    Trier is Germany's oldest city. It boasts a number of impressive UNESCO World Heritage sites dating back to Roman times, and accompanying partners will find plenty of interesting things to explore. The greater Trier region is also known for its excellent wine and beautiful scenery. 

    Official website: ICAME36

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the CASS Summer School

    The ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences was inaugurated in 2013; the 2015 event is the third in the series.

    This summer school takes place under the aegis of CASS, a new ESRC research centre bringing a new method in the study of language – the corpus approach – to a range of social sciences. CASS is investigating the use and manipulation of language in society in a host of areas of pressing concern, including climate change, hate crime and education.

    A crucial part of the CASS remit is to provide researchers across the social sciences with the skills needed to apply the tools and techniques of corpus linguistics to the research questions that matter in their own discipline. To help achieve this aim, we have founded – and will continue to run on a sustained basis – the CASS Summer School, in order to foster graduate students and other junior researchers in developing these skills.

    Like CASS itself, this Summer School is funded and sponsored by the Economic and Social Research Council.

    Who is the CASS summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior social scientists – especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any of the social science disciplines. Anyone with an interest in the analysis of social issues via text and discourse – especially on a large scale – will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in the CASS Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does the CASS Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Dana Gablasova — Collecting corpus data
    • Amanda Potts — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: introduction for social scientists
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: critical considerations
    • Paul Rayson — Semantic annotation and key domains
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Amanda Potts — Language and the law

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    An important note

    The ESRC Summer School syllabus changes slightly from year to year, but the majority of its contents are fixed, and begin at the basic level. Therefore, no one who has previously participated in this summer school is eligible to take the course again.

    How to apply

    The CASS Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the UCREL Summer School

    The UCREL Summer School 2015 is the fifth event in a highly successful series that began in 2011. Sponsored by UCREL at Lancaster University – one of the world's leading and longest-established centres for corpus-based research – its aim is to support students of language and linguistics in the development of advanced skills in corpus methods.

    The UCREL Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, and others) who require in-depth knowledge of corpus-based methodologies for their degree projects. It is not aimed at raw beginners, but rather at students who have at least some introductory experience of analysis using language corpora, and who wish to expand their knowledge of key issues and techniques in cutting-edge corpus research.

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The instructors include, as well as speakers from Lancaster University, external guest speakers who are prominent specialists in their respective fields. In the 2015 syllabus, speakers, and their session titles, include:

    • Alistair Baron — Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Vaclav Brezina — Understanding statistics for corpus analysis Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis
    • Claire Hardaker — Applying corpus methods in forensic linguistics
    • Andrew Hardie — The statistics of collocation; and Part-of-speech taggers: how they work, and how they go wrong
    • John Flowerdew — Corpora and academic discourse
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Yukio Tono — Error annotations in learner corpus research: approach, method, and technique

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School

    The Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is a new addition to the annual set of summer schools for 2015. It is jointly sponsored by the UCREL and CASS research centres at Lancaster University.

    This summer school offers a practical introduction to the statistical procedures that can be used for analysis of linguistic data compiled into language corpora. The curriculum provides an overview of the main statistical procedures used in the field of corpus linguistics together with simple examples of application of these methods.

    The “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and others) who wish to learn about the use of statistics to explore language corpora. It is taught by Dr. Vaclav Brezina with contributions from other staff from Lancaster University and members of the CASS Challenge Panel.

    The summer school does not require any prior knowledge of statistics; however, it does assume that participants have some experience of corpus linguistics at least at a basic level.

    The following topics will be covered (some shared with the Corpus Linguistics Summer School):

    • An introduction to understanding statistics for corpus analysis
    • Frequency and dispersion; descriptive and inferential statistics
    • The statistics of collocation
    • Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Null hypothesis significance testing and effect sizes
    • Inter-rater agreement
    • Historical corpora and time series analysis
    • Sampling methods and representativeness
    • Statistics in corpus-based sociolinguistics
    • Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when finalised.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL/CASS Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is a new addition to our annual event for 2015.

    About this Summer School

    Across the Arts and Humanities, a number of parallel trends are developing new methods, especially digital methods, for reading text and texts. We see this in the form of the Digital Humanities enterprise, but also in renewed interest in different forms of Distant Reading.

    Thus there exists a growing need for advanced digital-methods training for Arts and Humanities researchers – especially but not only in the fields of History and Literary Studies, where the large-scale analysis of textual databases is increasingly important. Meanwhile, a set of effective tools and techniques have been developed within the discipline of Corpus Linguisticswhich can answer this methodological need. In particular they allow jointly qualitative-quantitative analyses which go beyond statistical summary to a critical engagement with text and context.

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities has been inaugurated to help explore and extend the benefits of these approaches for researchers, particularly PhD students and other junior researchers, in arts and humanities fields.

    The summer school's syllabus draws on expertise from across several departments at Lancaster University – History, English and Creative Writing, Linguistics and English Language, and Computing and Communications. Lancaster's UCREL research centre has been at the forefront of the field of Corpus Linguistics since its foundation in the 1970s, and is now a leading centre for the development of corpus methods in other fields across the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.

    Who is this summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior arts and humanities researchers – especially but not only PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any discipline. Anyone in these fields with an interest in novel methodologies, digital humanities, distant reading, “big data” or generally in the use of large textual databases such as EEBO-TCP, newspaper archives, and so on, will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in this Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does this Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The initial sessions on basic, foundational methods are conducted jointly with the co-located ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Science. These introductory sessions are followed by a series of discussions of advanced contemproary research using corpus methods in the humanities: conceptual early modern literary studies, and Shakespearian stylistics more specifically. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Dana Gablasova — Collecting corpus data
    • Amanda Potts — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Tony McEnery/Helen Baker — Studying social history with corpora: prostitution in the 17th century
    • Alison Findlay — Using corpora in early modern Literary Studies
    • Alistair Baron — Spelling variation: problems, analysis and solutions
    • Stephen Pumprey — Studying conceptual history using EEBO-TCP
    • Jonathan Culpeper — Exploring Shakespeare's language with corpus techniques

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    This Summer School is an intensive, hands-on introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems aimed at PhD students and other junior researchers in the digital humanities.

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is the field of geography devoted to the visualisation, in the form of maps, of non-visual data sources. These data sources can range from statistical databases to corpora of literary texts.

    The Summer School in GIS for the Digital Humanities is sponsored by the European Research Council as part of the five-year project Spatial Humanities: Texts, Geographic Information Systems and Places. It is taught by Prof. Ian Gregory and Dr. Catherine Porter.

    • Prof. Gregory is the principle investigator of the Spatial Humanities project, and a leading specialist in GIS and its application across the social sciences and humanities. He is the author (with P. S. Ell) of the book Historical GIS: Technologies, Methodologies, and Scholarship.
    • Dr. Porter is a research associate on the Spatial Humanities project. Her background is in geography, with a particular specialism in Goegraphic Information Systems. Her research interests include the application of GIS and various quantitative techniques in the digital humanities, historical geography, the history of cartography and how early maps may be interrogated using quantitative techniques.

    For more information, see http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/projects/spatialhum.wordpress/?page_id=53.

    Programme

    Over four days, a series of intensive lab-based sessions will be used to introduce GIS, from the basic concepts, to the use of key software including ArcGIS, to a consideration of approaches for applying GIS in different kinds of humanities research. The aim is to give participants the skills needed to exploit GIS techniques in their own research – allowing the spatial dimension to emerge in the study of digital humanities.

    Sessions include:

    • Introduction to GIS in the Humanities
    • Cartography in ArcGIS
    • Working with tabular data
    • Data integration through overlay and buffering
    • Places, coordinates and point data
    • Geo-referencing historical data
    • Geo-visualization using Google Earth

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    How to apply

    This Summer School event is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Mon
    20
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    24
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The eighth international Corpus Linguistics conference (CL2015) will be held at Lancaster University from Tuesday 21st July 2015 to Friday 24th July 2015, preceded by a workshop day on Monday 20th July.

    This series of conferences began with Corpus Linguistics 2001, an event celebrating the career of Professor Geoffrey Leech, on the occasion of his retirement. In August of 2014, we reported with great sadness Geoff's sudden death.

    Geoff was not only the founder of the UCREL research centre for corpus linguistics at Lancaster University, he was also the first Professor and founding Head of the Department of Linguistics and English Language. His contributions to linguistics – not only in corpus linguistics, but also in English grammar, pragmatics and stylistics – were immense. After his retirement, he not only continued his own research but also, characteristically, to provide advice, support and encouragement for students and junior colleagues. He is remembered as an inspirational teacher and mentor, and a kind and generous friend.

    By dedicating this eighth conference in the Corpus Linguistics series once again to a celebration of Geoff's life, his career, and his truly remarkable influence on the field, we once more pay tribute to, and commemorate, a remarkable intellect and a sorely-missed colleague.

    Plenary speakers

    We are delighted to announce that the following speakers have accepted our invitation to give plenary lectures at CL2015:

    More about the conference

    This conference is hosted by the UCREL research centre, which brings together the Department of Linguistics and English Language with the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster.

    For registration and more information, visit the conference's official website: http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/cl2015/

  • Fri
    18
    Sep
    2015
    ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University

    Communication about health and illness is both an opportunity and a challenge: successful communication can positively contribute to diagnosis, treatment and wellbeing; unsuccessful communication can hinder diagnosis and treatment, and cause or increase distress and anxiety.

    It is therefore no surprise that communication skills are increasingly part of medical training, and that there has recently been a surge of interest in the study of language and interaction in healthcare settings, for example in the areas of ‘medical humanities’, ‘health humanities’ and ‘narrative medicine’. Patients and carers also increasingly use online resources and online fora to obtain information and to interact with people who share similar experiences. This has considerably increased the amount of data available for analysis.

    The use of corpus-based methods in studying different aspects of health communication has also developed in recent years. The application of these methods has the potential to increase understanding of the experiences of patients, carers and health professionals, and to help tackle some of the communicative issues faced by members of all three groups.
    This free workshop provides an overview of the state of the art in corpus approaches to health communication. The four morning lectures will introduce four different corpusbased projects in different areas of health communication. The three afternoon workshops will provide the opportunity to practise the use of different corpus tools for the analysis of participants’ own data, or of data provided by the organisers.

    We welcome participants from all academic and practice backgrounds. Familiarity with corpus linguistic methods is not a requirement.

    Places are limited, and are allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. Please register online by clicking here: http://corpora.lancs.ac.uk/submission/registration.php?conference=13

  • Mon
    21
    Sep
    2015
    Lancaster University

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) and the Department of Sociology are pleased to announce a one-day symposium on Changing Climates and the Media taking place at Lancaster University on 21st Sep 2015.

    This is the end-of-grant event of the CASS project on Changing Climates. The symposium will bring together leading academics from various disciplines, community experts and the Environment Agency in a unique event to discuss recent research on climate change and the media from a wide range of perspectives. Presentations will cover various countries, including Brazil, UK, Germany and Italy. Click here to see details of the programme.

    We are all looking forward very much to this event.

  • Thu
    12
    Nov
    2015
    16:00 - 21:00International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester

    CASS is excited to announce an upcoming event at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester on Thursday 12th November from 4pm-9pm.

    “Language matters: communication, culture and society” is a mini-series of four informal talks showcasing the impact of language on society. The timely themes will be presented in an approachable manner that will be accessible to a general audience, stimulating to novice language researchers, and interesting to social scientists. Topics include hate speech, myths about impoliteness, and online aggression. Each talk incorporates an element of social science research beyond linguistics and we will take this opportunity to emphasise the importance of interdisciplinary work.

    Afterwards, the audience will be invited to a drinks reception, during which they will have the opportunity to engage further with speakers and to network with guests.

    In a single event, participants will have the opportunity to hear renowned scholars talk about their lives, their work, and what they find most interesting about the relationship between language and society. Talks are short, energetic, and pitched for a general audience.

    Speakers

    • “Impoliteness: The language of offence” - Jonathan Culpeper
    • “Vile Words. What is the case for criminalizing everyday hate speech as hate crime?” - Paul Iganski
    • “The ethics of investigating online aggression: where does ‘virtual’ end and ‘reality’ begin?” - Claire Hardaker
    • “Spoken English in UK society” - Robbie Love

    This free event is part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science 2015. Please register online to book your place.

    For a taste of what’s in store, please see this video recap of a similar event held in London last year. For more information, please visit the ESRC website

  • Sat
    28
    Nov
    2015
    Cardiff University

    CLS10 will be hosted by the Centre for Language and Communication Research (CLCR) at Cardiff University, Wales on Saturday 28th November 2015. CLCR works at the interface of theoretical and applied research in the domains of identity and culture, linguistic knowledge, and professional and public discourse.

    The aim of CLS10 is to draw our attention to the ways in which corpus-based methods can be utilised to examine features of public and professional discourse. It also focuses on the application of such research to real life situations and problems. We welcome proposals for papers covering topics such as:

    • Healthcare communication; doctor-patient interaction; health questionnaires and surveys;
    • Language and the law; courtroom discourse; analysis of trials and judgements;
    • Academic discourse; language of the classroom; teacher-student exchanges;
    • Language in the media; newsworthiness; news production and reception;
    • Corporate communication; corporate reports; financial disclosures; discourses of corporate risk, security, and apologies;
    • Ethical considerations in analysis of professional and public discourse;
    • Exploration of the erosion of public/private distinctions in modern discourse;

    Presentations on methodological aspects of collecting, cleaning, and making use of corpora of professional and public discourse will also be considered.

    Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 10th August 2015

    Abstract requirements:

    Individual papers have 25 minutes: 20 for the presentation, 5 for questions. Please format your abstract in the following way:

    • Abstracts must be written in Times New Roman 12 (do not use all caps, no bold print)
    • Text should be 300 words maximum (including references, if any)
    • Abstracts should be submitted via email to Dawn Knight: KnightD5@Cardiff.ac.uk

    Registration:

    In keeping with all Corpus Linguistics in the South events, this is a FREE event. A light buffet lunch will be provided, but participants must pay for their own travel costs. There is a very limited number of places for participants and attendance at the event will operate on a first-come first-served basis. After the deadline for abstracts has closed and papers accepted, information regarding the registration process for speakers and participants will be circulated.

    Further information about CLCR is available here