Events

  • Thu
    25
    Apr
    2013
    2:00 pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 3

    Presenter: Elena Semino (LAEL, Lancaster University) 

    This talk arises from a collaboration with a consultant at the Eastman Dental Hospital in London who specialises in the diagnosis of chronic facial pain. One of the tools that are used for the diagnosis of chronic pain generally, and facial pain in particular, is the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). The MPQ includes 78 one-word descriptors (e.g. 'sharp', 'hot', 'nauseating'), arranged into 20 semantically-related groups. It is widely used in order to assess both the quality and intensity of patients' pain, with the ultimate goal of arriving at diagnosis and effective treatment or management. While the use of the MPQ is well-established, there are also problems with it, which are partly due to the choice of linguistic descriptors and the ways in which they are grouped. I will present the results of preliminary corpus-based analyses I have carried out in order to investigate various aspects of variation in the MPQ that might interfere with its effectiveness in clinical contexts. I will also share some of the experiences I have had in communicating my findings with health professionals. I will seek advice from the audience of the best ways of taking this work forward using corpus linguistic methods.

  • Thu
    16
    May
    2013
    2pm - 3pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 2/3

    Presenter: Mike Thelwall (University of Wolverhampton) 

    This talk will describe a sentiment analysis program, SentiStrength, which estimates the strength of sentiments expressed in social web texts. SentiStrength has many language variants but works primarily in English and takes advantage of both traditional and computer-specific ways of expressing sentiment 🙂 The program is available for testing and downloading online at http://sentistrength.wlv.ac.uk in both Windows and Java versions. The talk will demonstrate some applications of SentiStrength, including sentiment trends in Twitter relating to major events and finding good answers to questions via Yahoo!.

    http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/crs/presentation.php?id=2

  • Mon
    10
    Jun
    2013
    2pm - 3pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 3

    Presenter: Neil MillarUniversity of Birmingham

    The evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching in universities most commonly involves asking students for feedback - so called Student Evaluations of Teaching (SETs). These are typically written questionnaires comprising predominantly Likert-scale type items. As such, the responses that students can provide are heavily constrained by the design of the instrument. Although SETs often contain opportunities for free-text comments, to date, there have been no large-scale analyses of the perceptions, opinions and beliefs that the students themselves choose to express. Systematic analyses of free-text responses have the potential to inform our understanding of what students value in teaching, what constitutes effective teaching and how we might best assess it.

    This presentation reports a large-scale analysis of over half a million free-text comments on the popular review website RateMyProfessors.com (RMP). Principal components analysis (PCA) of adjectives was used to identify how students commonly perceive their instructors. Seven principal components were extracted and categorized based on component loadings:

    1. HELPFULNESS (e.g. helpful, willing, approachable)
    2. FUNNINESS (e.g. funny, hilarious, entertaining)
    3. INTELLIGENCE (e.g. brilliant, intelligent, knowledgeable)
    4. RUDENESS (e.g. rude, condescending, arrogant)
    5. INCOMPETENCE (e.g. disorganized, confusing, not_clear)
    6. TOUGHNESS (e.g. tough, difficult, not_easy)
    7. HOTNESS (e.g. hot, gorgeous, sexy)

    Secondary analyses explored the relationship between these dimensions and (1) corresponding Likert scale ratings, and (2) the Five Factor model of personality traits. It is argued that the components reflect latent dimensions along which commonly perceive their instructors. Discussion of the results raises practical implications for educational assessment and teaching, and methodological implications for the use of questionnaire data in the social sciences.

  • Thu
    13
    Jun
    2013
  • Tue
    18
    Jun
    2013
    5pm-10pmLive webstream

    Watch the live webstream at http://www.ted.com/tedx/events/7462 to see a dynamic and diverse group of speakers (including our own CASS Director Tony McEnery) give short lectures on the theme of 'The Journey So Far'. 

  • Thu
    20
    Jun
    2013
    2pm - 3pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 1

    Presenters: Vaclav Brezina & Dana Gablasova

    Learning vocabulary is a complex process in which the learner needs to acquire both the form and a variety of meanings/uses of a given lexical item (Nation, 2001). For the beginner the main question, of course, is where to start. General vocabulary wordlists can assist in this process by providing a list of common vocabulary items. Although there are a number of general vocabulary lists available, the by far most influential and widely-used both in pedagogy and vocabulary research is West's GSL (Carter 2012). However, a number of problems with West's GSL have been pointed out over the years (cf. Gilner 2011).

    In response to the problems identified with the GSL, this study offers a bottom-up, quantitative approach to the development of a New General Service List (new-GSL) by means of examining frequent general words across four language corpora (LOB, BNC, BE06 and EnTenTen12) of the total size of almost 13 billion running words. The four corpora were selected to represent a variety of corpus sizes (from one million to over 12 billion tokens) and approaches to representativeness and sampling (from small samples to whole documents). The study brought strong evidence about the stability of the core English vocabulary across a variety of language corpora including different written and spoken contexts. We examined the overlap between 3000 most frequent vocabulary items and identified substantial correspondence between the four corpora in terms of the number of shared items (71%) as well as the distribution of the words in the wordlists (as established by a series of Spearman's correlations). The final product, the new-GSL, consists of a total of 2,496 words. It is divided into the base part (2118 items) and the current vocabulary part (378 items). The new-GSL covers between 80.1 and 81.7 per cent of text in the source corpora, which is comparable to the coverage of West's GSL. In its present form, the new-GSL can be used both for lexical research and development of teaching materials.

    http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/crs/presentation.php?id=40

  • Sat
    13
    Jul
    2013
    Sun
    14
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    Thirty years ago saw the publication of Geoffrey Leech’s Principles of Pragmatics. To mark that event and the subsequent flowering of pragmatics at Lancaster we are holding a Pragmatics Summer School. Topics areas will include: the semantics-pragmatics interface, cross-cultural pragmatics, intercultural pragmatics, variational pragmatics, historical pragmatics, Spanish Pragmatics, pragmatics and corpus linguistics, (im)politeness, (im)politeness and CMC.

    Plenary/key speakers:

    • Geoffrey Leech
    • Jenny Thomas
    • Ken Turner
    • Helen Spencer-Oatey
    • Jonathan Culpeper
    • Maria Elena Placencia
    • Dawn Archer
    • Derek Bousfield
    • Claire Hardaker

     Website: For more information, visit the website.

  • Mon
    15
    Jul
    2013
    Thu
    18
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    This Summer School is an intensive, hands-on introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) aimed at PhD students and other junior researchers in the digital humanities. GIS is the field of geography devoted to the visualisation, in the form of maps, of non-visual data sources. These data sources can range from statistical databases to corpora of literary texts.

    Over four days, a series of intensive lab-based sessions will be used to introduce GIS, from the basic concepts, to the use of key software including Arc GIS, to a consideration of approaches for applying GIS in different kinds of humanities research. The aim is to give participants the skills needed to exploit GIS techniques in their own research – allowing the spatial dimension to emerge in the study of digital humanities.

    This Summer School event is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    16
    Jul
    2013
    Fri
    19
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    The UCREL Summer School 2013 is the third event in a highly successful series that began in 2011. Sponsored by UCREL at Lancaster University - one of the world's leading and longest-established centres for corpus-based research - its aim is to support students of language and linguistics in the development of advanced skills in corpus methods.

    The UCREL Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students and postdoctoral researchers) who require in-depth knowledge of corpus-based methodologies for their degree projects. It is not aimed at raw beginners, but rather at PhD students who have at least some introductory experience of analysis using language corpora, and who wish to expand their knowledge of key issues and techniques in cutting-edge corpus research.

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. Topics include: Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions, and Spelling variation: historical, child and online data; Using XML in corpus encoding and analysis and The statistics of collocation; Studying language change in diachronic corpora; Corpus-based approaches to metaphor in discourse; Pragmatics, politeness and impoliteness in the corpus; Using comparable and parallel corpora in contrastive and translation studies; Understanding statistics for corpus analysis.

    The UCREL summer school is part of three 'Lancaster Summer Schools in Interdisciplinary Digital Methods', see the website for further information. 

    How to apply

    The UCREL Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, see the website.

  • Tue
    16
    Jul
    2013
    Fri
    19
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    The first ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences takes place under the aegis of CASS.

    Who can attend?

    A crucial part of the CASS remit is to provide researchers across the social sciences with the skills needed to apply the tools and techniques of corpus linguistics to the research questions that matter in their own discipline. This event is aimed at junior social scientists – especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any of the social science disciplines. Anyone with an interest in the analysis of social issues via text and discourse – especially on a large scale – will find this summer school of interest.

    Programme

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. Topics include: Introduction to corpus linguistics; Corpus tools and techniques; Collecting corpus data; Foundational techniques for social science data - keywords and collocation; Understanding statistics for corpus analysis; Discourse analysis for the social sciences; Semantic annotation and key domains; Corpus-based approaches to metaphor in discourse; Pragmatics, politeness and impoliteness in the corpus. Speakers include Paul Baker, Jonathan Culpeper, and Elena Semino.

    The CASS Summer School is part of three ‘Lancaster Summer Schools in Interdisciplinary Digital Methods’, see the website for further information. There are additional daily plenary lectures shared with the other two Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge digital research methods using corpus data. The confirmed plenary speakers are Tony McEnery, Ian Gregory, and Stephen Pumfrey.

    How to apply

    The CASS Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, see the website.

  • Mon
    22
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    The main CL2013 conference will be preceded by a workshop day on Monday 22nd July. On this day, the following pre-conference workshops will be offered:

    More information -- including detailed workshop descriptions and a provisional schedule -- will be published on the CL2013 Workshop webpage as it becomes available.

  • Tue
    23
    Jul
    2013
    Fri
    26
    Jul
    2013
    Lancaster University

    The seventh international Corpus Linguistics conference (CL2013) will be held at Lancaster University from Tuesday 23rd July 2013 to Friday 26th July 2013. The conference is hosted by the UCREL research centre, which brings together the Department of Linguistics and English Language with the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster. The goals of the conference are:

    • To gather together current and developing research in the study and application of corpus linguistics;
    • To push the field forwards by promoting dialogue among the many different users of corpora across interconnected sub-disciplines of linguistics – be they descriptive, theoretical, applied or computational;
    • To explore new challenges both within corpus linguistics, and in the extension of corpus approaches to new fields of study.

    Plenary/key speakers:

    • Karin Aijmer
    • Guy Cook
    • Michael Hoey
    • Ute Römer

    Website: For more information, visit the CL2013 website.

  • Wed
    28
    Aug
    2013
    9:00am - 3:30pmiCourts Open Meeting Area, Studiegaarden, Studiestraede 6, 1st floor, DK-1455 Copenhagen K

    iCourts invites to the seminar Law as Texts in Context: International Case Law from a Discourse Perspective focusing on the application of corpus linguistics and discourse analysis in legal research.

    One of the main objectives of iCourts’ research agenda is to explain how international law establishes itself as an independent legal order through the case law of international courts. We want to study that development, not through a conventional legal analysis of the court decisions, but through a variety of descriptive approaches that entail a detailed study of the discursive processes that create, influence and change international law. These include discourse analysis and corpus linguistics.

    The speakers at this research seminar are all renowned researchers in their respective fields, and will present their view on how descriptive studies of law as text can elucidate not only the texts of law, but also the law as text. In doing so, they invite the participants to reflect on the possible gains, losses, new understandings and misunderstandings that may result from applying insights of language studies and linguistic methods in legal research.

    See the programme here: http://jura.ku.dk/icourts/calendar/law-texts-in-context/programme/

  • Wed
    04
    Sep
    2013
    Fri
    06
    Sep
    2013
    Lancaster University, UK

    Lancaster Centre for Mobilities Research: Call for Participation

    As part of celebrations of the tenth anniversary of the Centre for Mobilities Research (CeMoRe) at Lancaster University, we are pleased to announce the Global Conference on Mobility Futures, September 4-6th, 2013, at Lancaster University, UK and invite contributions.

    Over the past ten years the work of CeMoRe and others have helped to 'mobilise' the social and human sciences and developed innovative analyses of economic, social, technological, political, policy and design transformations.

    The 'Global Conference on Mobility Futures' will reflect this work and provide a forum for the presentation of cutting edge research from across the social sciences that reflects back on, explores the present and looks towards future mobilities.

    See the website for more details. We look forward to seeing you in Lancaster! 

  • Thu
    12
    Sep
    2013
    5:30pm - 7:00pmBradley Forum, UniSA City West campus, Hawke Building level 5, 55 North Terrace, Adelaide

    Jointly presented by The Bob Hawke Prime Ministerial Centre and Hawke Research Institute at UniSA

    What are the costs - at once personal, social and environmental - of our civilization's carbon addiction?  Does the Age of Tough Oil necessarily mean the 'powering down' of societies?  What does the future hold for people, energy and climates in a post-carbon world?  In this wide-ranging discussion with one of Europe's most celebrated social thinkers, John Urry discusses the scale, speed and impact of future energy changes over the next century.  From oil dregs to carbon rationing, Urry envisions the future of an oil-dependent world facing energy descent.

    In Conversation with.....

    John Urry is widely acknowledged as one of Europe's most important social theorists.  He is Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Lancaster University. Educated at Cambridge University, he is the editor of the International Library of Sociology; Co-editor of Mobilities and Director of the Lancaster Centre for Mobilities Research. His recent books include Automobilities (2005), Mobilities, Networks, Geographies (2006), Mobilities (2007), Aeromobilities (2009), After the Car (2009),Mobile Lives (with Anthony Elliott, 2010), Mobile Methods (2011), The Tourist Gaze 3.0 (2011) and Climate Change and Society (2011).

    Anthony Elliott is Director of the Hawke Research Institute, where he is Research Professor of Sociology at the University of South Australia. He is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and is the author and editor of some thirty books, translated into over a dozen languages. His most recent books include Making The Cut: How Cosmetic Surgery is Transforming our Lives (Chicago University Press, 2008), The New Individualism (with Charles Lemert, Routledge, 2009), and Reinvention (Routledge, 2013).

    Visit the official website for more information.

  • Mon
    16
    Sep
    2013
    5pm - 6pmUniversity of Wollongong

    Distinguished Professor John Urry invites you to an exclusive lecture, where he will present his forthcoming book Offshoring: Secrets, Lies & Globalization

    John Urry is the co-founder and Director of the Centre for Mobilities Research at Lancaster University and is the founding co-editor of the journal Mobilities and author of numerous books on globalization, capitalism and tourism.

  • Fri
    20
    Sep
    2013
    9:30am - 5:30pmLancaster University

    A one-day workshop hosted by the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science

    In recent times, there has been lively public interest in online “aggressive” phenomena such as flaming, trolling, and cyberbullying. However, in the field of computer-mediated communication (CMC), whilst some studies have been conducted on the social dynamics of digital media, relatively few have focused specifically on politeness or impoliteness, despite their centrality to social interaction, obvious relevance to digital communication, keen public interest and recent explosion in related academic activity (witness the establishment in 2005 of the Journal of Politeness Research). Corpus-related approaches – typically involving the computational analysis of vast collections of text – to studying the nature of digital communication are still in their infancy. The aim of this workshop is to explore the potential that the array of corpus-related approaches might have for enhancing our understandings of social interaction in digital communication in general, and (im)politeness in particular.

    The workshop will encompass a range of digital communication types, such as email, blogs, texts and tweets. It is not restricted to any particular definition of politeness or impoliteness. Broadly, we understand politeness to be the social spadework that we undertake to oil the wheels of interaction and impoliteness to be the opposite. As far as politeness is concerned, issues in the domain of digital communication might include: What are the politeness practices of particular media (e.g. what are considered polite ways of opening or closing, of achieving particular goals, or of self-disclosing)? How do they vary across types? As far as impoliteness is concerned, issues in the domain of digital communication might include: What are the characteristics of impoliteness-related practices such as flaming, trolling and cyberbullying? How are they to be defined? Why are the new digital media often perceived by the public as sources of impoliteness, and how true is this perception? As far as corpus-related approaches are concerned, issues we might explore include: How is data sourced? What are the ethical issues? How is data transcribed for computational analysis, especially when multiple writers and addressees are involved? How is the social context factored in to the corpus? How can corpus-related approaches handle pragmatic phenomena in general and (im)politeness in particular? What is to be gained from using notions like collocates, keywords and word sketches?

    The workshop will involve a mixture of activities. At its core there will be three presentations by the following speakers:

    • Andrew Kehoe and Ursula Lutzky (Birmingham City University, UK)
    • Ruth Page (University of Leicester, UK)
    • Caroline Tagg (University of Birmingham, UK)

    In addition, we will have discussion panels, and a data exhibition. Regarding the data exhibition, participants may, if they wish, submit samples of data along with very brief descriptions of their research interests to our team. We will apply corpus methods to that data. In the data exhibition, we will present snapshot analyses and discuss methodological issues. (Please see the simple data-submission guidelines if you wish to take advantage of this.)

    Organisers: Jonathan Culpeper and Claire Hardaker

  • Sat
    28
    Sep
    2013
    Mon
    30
    Sep
    2013
    Queen Mary, University of London

    This is the fifth in a biennial series of international conferences organized around the role of the media in relation to the representation, construction and production of language.

    The primary theme of the 2013 conference will be on journalism – in its many historical and contemporary manifestations – and its redefinition in the face of social media and established practice, taking its cue from the confluence of historic Fleet Street and new media and digital innovation in London.

    Also on the agenda: A plenary panel of active journalists and linguists talking about what has changed in journalism and what remains the same, with an eye to inspiring future research/ers and providing new directions for investigation of language in the media.

    Plenary speakers

    Allan Bell (Auckland University of Technology, NZ)
    Martin Conboy (University of Sheffield, UK)
    Helen Kelly-Holmes (University of Limerick, Ireland)
    Daniel Perrin (Zurich University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland)

    Website: http://linguistics.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/LangMedia2013

  • Wed
    23
    Oct
    2013
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology

    Costas Gabrielatos will give two courses, 'Keyword analysis', and 'Beyond word frequency'.

    Keyword analysis

    In this session Gabrielatos will explore definitions of the terms keyword and keyness, and discuss appropriate metrics, focusing on the distinction between effect size and statistical significance. He will also focus on how to derive true keywords (i.e. based on effect-size), while also catering for statistical significance, as all but one current corpus tools use an inappropriate metric (log-likelihood), which only specifies statistical significance (the exception being Sketch Engine).

    Beyond word frequency

    Overall, this session will focus on a more comprehensive view of  'frequency: it will discuss how the normalized word frequency in a corpus may not always be the best way to count instances of a linguistic feature, and why it is best to view the normalized frequency of a linguistic unit as the number of instances of a feature out of the total number of opportunities for it to appear (Ball, 1994). The session will also focus on how the total number of instances (however measured) may be misleading on its own, and may need to be supplemented with  metrics of dispersion/spread. Regarding word frequency, the session will show how token and type frequencies can be examined in combination – not collapsed into a single type-token ratio metric, but visualised two-dimensionally in a scatterplot.

    Websites

    Fall School in Corpus Linguistics: http://www.ntnu.edu/lingphil/corpus-linguistics

    Fall School full schedule: http://www.ntnu.edu/lingphil/schedule

  • Thu
    24
    Oct
    2013
    2pm - 3pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 1

    More information on the UCREL CRS page: http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/crs/presentation.php?id=44

  • Thu
    31
    Oct
    2013
    Lancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 3

    More information on the UCREL CRS website: http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/crs/presentation.php?id=45

  • Wed
    06
    Nov
    2013
    4:00pm - 5:00pm D18, Fylde, Lancaster University

    Speaker: Max Louwerse, Professor Cognitive Psychology and Artificial Intelligence, Tilburg Center for Cognition and Communication, Tilburg University

    A vast amount of literature has demonstrated that cognitive processes can be explained by a perceptual simulation account. Oftentimes such studies interpret an effect for perceptual simulation as the only explanation. This talk will discuss whether there are alternatives. One such alternative is provided by the Symbol Interdependency Hypothesis, which proposes that language encodes perceptual information. Language has evolved into a system of regularities that allows for a symbolic shortcut to perceptual relations in the world around us. Language users can rely on symbolic and perceptual relations depending on the nature of the stimulus, the cognitive task, and the individual, as well as the time course of processing. The Symbol Interdependency Hypothesis thereby emphasizes the role of language statistics in cognitive processing: Various studies ranging from conceptual metaphor, iconic relationships, geographical orientation, and the Spatial Numerical Association of Response Codes (SNARC) will be discussed showing that what might seem to be best explained by a perceptual simulation account is in fact best explained by statistical linguistic frequencies.

  • Sat
    09
    Nov
    2013
    University of Portsmouth

    Corpus-assisted discourse analysis across languages

    09.30 Arrival & coffee

    09.45 Introductions

    10.00 Overview of the area & aims of the workshop, Rachelle Vessey, Newcastle University & Charlotte Taylor, University of Sussex

    10.15 Translation studies, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics: An overview, Bandar Al-Hejin, Institute of Public Administration (English Language Center), Riyadh

    11.00 Corpus-based intercultural pragmatics, Rachele de Felice, University College London

    11.45 A contrastive discourse analysis of patient-centred communication in British, Italian and Spanish Ask-the- Expert Healthcare Websites, Gabrina Pounds, University of East Anglia

    12.30 Case-studies

    Corpus-Based Investigations into the Attitudes to Bilingualism and Code-Switching: Insights from German and Polish migrant discussion forums Sylvia Jaworska, University of Reading

    The linguistic framing of inequality in times of austerity: A corpus linguistics study of ‘fairness’ in elite political discourse in Spain and Britain, Rosa Escanes Sierra, University of Sheffield

    13.00 Lunch

    14.25 Comparative analyses of discourse key words across languages: integration and multicultural society in English and German, Melani Schroeter, University of Reading

    15.10 A corpus-linguistic approach to the analysis of transnational political discourses. Europe in British, French and German election manifestos, Ronny Scholz, University of Warwick

    (5 min break)

    16.00 Public apology felicity conditions in British and French apology press uptakes, Clyde Ancarno, King’s College

    16.45 Problems, solutions & where next? Open discussion led by Charlotte Taylor, University of Sussex & Rachelle Vessey, Newcastle University

    To attend, please contact charlotte.taylor@sussex.ac.uk or rachelle.vessey@newcastle.ac.uk 

  • Wed
    13
    Nov
    2013
    2:00pm - 3:00pmLancaster University, FASS Meeting Room 3

    Title: A corpus linguistic approach to newsworthiness - Towards a new methodological framework for analyzing news discourse in Critical Discourse Analysis and beyond

    Presenter: Monika Bednarek (University of Sydney)

    In this talk I will introduce a new framework for the analysis of news discourse, which emphasises the importance of news values for linguistic analysis and encourages a constructivist approach to their analysis. This framework is situated within what Bednarek & Caple (2012a, b) call a 'discursive' approach to news values. From this perspective, the primary research interest is in how texts construct newsworthiness. The framework itself is intended for both multimodal discourse analysis and corpus linguistic analysis, although in this paper I will focus on the integration of corpus linguistic methods. The guiding question is: how can corpus techniques help us to identify the linguistic construction of newsworthiness in a given text or corpus?

    http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/crs/presentation.php?id=47 

  • Fri
    10
    Jan
    2014
    Lancaster University, UK

    The Metaphor in End of Life Care ('MELC') Project at Lancaster University is using a corpus-based approach to investigate the role of metaphor in language used to talk about end-of-life care by patients, carers, and healthcare professionals. As part of our project activities, we will be holding a one-day workshop on 'Using Corpus Methods to Analyse Metaphor in Discourse' at Lancaster on 10th January 2014. This event is aimed at those with an interest in using corpus linguistic methods to investigate metaphor, particularly in the area of health communication. The workshop will include presentations and training sessions, and the programme is available here.

    There is no fee to attend this event, which includes lunch and refreshments. Places are limited, however. We are able to offer funding for UK economy-class travel and one night's accommodation on campus, up to a combined maximum of £100, for 15 participants, on a first-come, first-served basis. A further 9 places are available without funding for travel or accommodation.

    To register for a place at the workshop, please e-mail Dr Jane Demmen (j.demmen@lancaster.ac.uk) by 31st October 2013, indicating the name of the institution with which you are affiliated and whether you are a member of staff or a student.

    The MELC project is funded by the Economic and Social Research Funding Council (ESRC) and associated with Lancaster's ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science). For more information about Wmatrix suite of corpus tools, see the website.

  • Fri
    07
    Mar
    2014
    Sun
    09
    Mar
    2014
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

    The aim of the APCLC 2014 is to bring together academics from around the world, and from the Asia Pacific area in particular, in order to report on the varied developments in the use of and investigation into corpora in linguistics, language learning and translation studies. Some countries have a number of well-developed projects related to the theoretical and applied aspects of corpus analysis; other countries are just starting to develop corpus resources. Through this conference, we will provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and expertise and lay the foundations for future developments in the application of corpus resources in Asia and the Pacific.

    Visit the official website for more information.

  • Wed
    30
    Apr
    2014
    Sun
    04
    May
    2014
    University of Nottingham

    The 35th ICAME conference is to be hosted by CRAL (Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics)School of English at the University of Nottingham in the spring of 2014.

    The Conference theme is 'Corpus Linguistics, Context and Culture'. The main conference will be opened with a talk by Professor Ronald Carter.

    For more information, visit the official website.

  • Thu
    08
    May
    2014
    The Work Foundation, 21 Palmer Street, London, SW1H 0AD

    The workshop will include the following sessions. The full programme is available to download here.

    • Welcome and opening: Professor Sheila Payne (Lancaster University)
    • The search for a final sense of meaning in end-of-life discourses: Professor Lukas Radbruch (University of Bonn)
    • The 'Metaphor in End-of-Life Care' project - data, questions and methods: Dr Jane Demmen and Dr Paul Rayson (Lancaster University)
    • 'Fight' and 'journey' metaphors for cancer revisited: Dr Veronika Koller and Professor Elena Semino (Lancaster University)
    • Listening to patient and professional voices in end-of-life care Dame Professor Barbara Monroe (Chief Executive, St Christopher's Hospice, London)
    • Narratives of 'good' and 'bad' deaths: Dr Zsofia Demjen (Open University) and Professor Elena Semino (Lancaster University)
    • Plenary discussion: chaired by Professor Sheila Payne (Lancaster University)
    • Closing: Dr Veronika Koller (Lancaster University)

    Please contact Jane Demmen for further information and to book one of the remaining places for this event: (j.demmen@lancs.ac.uk). NB: Places will be allocated on a 'first-come-first-served' basis. We may not be able to respond to individual emails after the event is full, but an update will be posted here in due course.

  • Tue
    27
    May
    2014
    15.00-16.30Lancaster University, Frankland Lecture Theatre, Faraday Building

    Lecture by Professor Detmar Meurers

    The automatic analysis of learner language is potentially relevant in a range of contexts, from the online analysis of learner language aimed at providing individual feedback in Intelligent Language Tutoring Systems (ILTS) to the automatic annotation of learner corpora in support of Second Language Acquisition (SLA) research and Foreign Language Teaching and Learning (FLTL) practice. In this talk, I want to raise some questions about the interpretation of learner data involved in any such analysis, focusing the discussion on learner corpora.Learner corpora as collections of language produced by second language learners have been systematically collected since the 90s, and with readily available collections such as ICLE and new Big-Data collections such as EFCamDat there is a growing empirical basis of potential relevance to SLA research. Yet, as soon as the research questions go beyond the acquisition of vocabulary and constructions with unambiguous surface indicators, corpora must be enhanced with linguistic annotation to support efficient retrieval of the instances of data that are relevant for specific research questions.

    In contrast to the different types of linguistic annotation schemes which have been developed for native language corpora, the discussion on which linguistic annotation is meaningful and appropriate for learner language is only starting. When formulating linguistic generalizations, one generally relies on a long tradition of linguistic analysis that has established an inventory of categories and properties abstracting away from the surface strings. We will show that traditional linguistic categories are not necessarily an appropriate index into the space of interlanguage realizations and their systematicity, which research into second language acquisition aims tocapture. We will argue for balancing robustness of categorization and representation of the actual observations and their variability. Complementing the discussion of the corpus annotation as such, we then discuss the need for explicit information about the task from which the corpus resulted and the learners who produced it for interpreting and annotating learner data.

    Background references:

    This event is a general lecture, co-organized by the Department of Linguistics and English Language, the Second Language Learning and Teaching Group (SLLAT), the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), and the University Centre for Computer Corpus Research on Language (UCREL).

    Contact: p.rebuschat@lancaster.ac.uk

    Who can attend: Anyone

  • Wed
    28
    May
    2014
    2.00-3.00pmLancaster University, Management School LT7

    Lecture by Professor Detmar Meurers

    The analysis of readability has traditionally relied on surface properties of language, such as average sentence and word lengths and specific word lists. At the same time, there is a long tradition analyzing the Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency (CAF) of language produced by language learners in second language acquisition (SLA) research. Reusing SLA measures of learner language complexity to analyze readability, Sowmya Vajjala and I explored which aspects of linguistic modeling can successfully be employed to predict the readability of a native language text. Using various machine learning setups and corpora, we show that a broad range of linguistic properties are highly indicative of the readability of documents, from graded readers to web pages and TV programs targeting different age groups. The readability model using our full linguistic feature set currently is the best non-commercial readability model available for English (and second overall, with the commercial ETS model coming in first), based on the performance on the Common Core State Standard data set.

    The fact that we found readability to be reflected in a wide range of linguistic aspects also has consequences for text simplification, where we are interested in identifying for which sentences which kind of simplification would be worthwhile. To support such research, we show that our text readability models can meaningfully be applied to individual sentences.The talk will try to trace the ideas sketched above based on the joint paper with Sowmya Vajjala listed below, which are downloadable from http://purl.org/dm/papers In case there is something you'd be particularly interested in, just send me an email so I can try to give it more time.

    References:

    • Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (to appear) "Readability Assessment for Text Simplification: From Analyzing Documents to Identifying Sentential Simplifications". International Journal of Applied Linguistics, Special Issue on Current Research in Readability and Text Simplification edited by Thomas François & Delphine Bernhard.
    • Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (2014) "Assessing the relative reading level of sentence pairs for text simplification". Proceedings of EACL. Gothenburg, Sweden.
    • Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (2014) "Exploring Measures of 'Readability' for Spoken Language: Analyzing linguistic features of subtitles to identify age-specific TV programs. Proceedings of the 3rd Workshop on Predicting and Improving Text Readability for Target Reader Populations (PITR), EACL. Gothenburg, Sweden.
    • Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (2013) "On The Applicability of Readability Models to Web Texts." Proceedings of the Workshop on Predicting and Improving Text Readability for Target Reader Populations (PITR), ACL. Sofia, Bulgaria.
    • Julia Hancke, Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (2012) "Readability Classification for German using lexical, syntactic, and morphological features". Proceedings of COLING, Mumbai, India.
    • Sowmya Vajjala and Detmar Meurers (2012) "On Improving the Accuracy of Readability Classification using Insights from Second Language Acquisition". Proceedings of BEA7, ACL. Montreal, Canada.

    Event website: http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/groups/sllat/programme.html

    Contact: p.rebuschat@lancaster.ac.uk

    Who can attend: Anyone

  • Thu
    19
    Jun
    2014
    Sat
    21
    Jun
    2014
    Newcastle University

    IVACS 2014 will take place in Newcastle, the cultural capital of the North East. IVACS 2014 is being organised by the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences at Newcastle University.

    Plenary speakers:

    • Michael McCarthy, University of Nottingham
    • Ronald Carter, University of Nottingham
    • Brona Murphy, University of Edinburgh
    • Dawn Knight, Newcastle University
    • Tony McEnery, Lancaster University
    • Andrew Hardie, Lancaster University

    For more information, visit the official website

  • Tue
    15
    Jul
    2014
    Fri
    18
    Jul
    2014
    Lancaster University, UK

    The ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences was inaugurated in 2013; the 2014 event is the second in the series. It will take place 15th to 18th July 2014, at Lancaster University, UK.

    This free-to-attend summer school takes place under the aegis of CASS (http://cass.lancs.ac.uk), an ESRC research centre bringing a new method in the study of language – the corpus approach – to a range of social sciences. CASS is investigating the use and manipulation of language in society in a host of areas of pressing concern, including climate change, hate crime and education.

    Who can attend?

    A crucial part of the CASS remit is to provide researchers across the social sciences with the skills needed to apply the tools and techniques of corpus linguistics to the research questions that matter in their own discipline. This event is aimed at junior social scientists – especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any of the social science disciplines. Anyone with an interest in the analysis of social issues via text and discourse – especially on a large scale – will find this summer school of interest.

    Programme

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented.

    Topics include: Introduction to corpus linguistics; Corpus tools and techniques; Collecting corpus data; Foundational techniques for social science data - keywords and collocation; Understanding statistics for corpus analysis; Discourse analysis for the social sciences; Semantic annotation and key domains; Corpus-based approaches to metaphor in discourse; Pragmatics, politeness and impoliteness in the corpus.

    Speakers include Tony McEnery, Paul Baker, Jonathan Culpeper, and Elena Semino.

    The CASS Summer School is one of the three co-located Lancaster Summer Schools in Interdisciplinary Digital Methods; see the website for further information:

    http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/summerschool

    How to apply

    The CASS Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited.

    The deadline for registrations is Sunday 8th June 2014.

    The application form is available on theevent website as is further information on the programme.

  • Tue
    15
    Jul
    2014
    Fri
    18
    Jul
    2014
    Lancaster University, UK

    The UCREL Summer School 2014 is the fourth event in a highly successful series that began in 2011. Sponsored by UCREL at Lancaster University – one of the world's leading and longest-established centres for corpus-based research – its aim is to support students of language and linguistics in the development of advanced skills in corpus methods.

    The UCREL Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, and others) who require in-depth knowledge of corpus-based methodologies for their degree projects. It is not aimed at raw beginners, but rather at students who have at least some introductory experience of analysis using language corpora, and who wish to expand their knowledge of key issues and techniques in cutting-edge corpus research.

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented.

    For more details on the programme and how to apply, please visit the event website.

  • Tue
    15
    Jul
    2014
    Fri
    18
    Jul
    2014
    Lancaster University, UK

    The ERC Summer School in GIS for the Digital Humanities is an intensive, hands-on introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems aimed at PhD students and other junior researchers in the digital humanities.

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is the field of geography devoted to the visualisation, in the form of maps, of non-visual data sources. These data sources can range from statistical databases to corpora of literary texts.

    The Summer School in GIS for the Digital Humanities is sponsored by the European Research Council as part of the five-year project Spatial Humanities: Texts, Geographic Information Systems and Places. It is taught by Prof. Ian Gregory.

    Over four days, a series of intensive lab-based sessions will be used to introduce GIS, from the basic concepts, to the use of key software including ArcGIS, to a consideration of approaches for applying GIS in different kinds of humanities research. The aim is to give participants the skills needed to exploit GIS techniques in their own research – allowing the spatial dimension to emerge in the study of digital humanities.

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other two Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data.

    For more information on the programme and how to apply, please visit the event webpage

  • Sat
    15
    Nov
    2014
    University of Reading

    The aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers who adopt the tools and approaches of Corpus Linguistics to study communication in online environments especially social media sites and interactive online and comment forums. We invite papers that:

    • look at the interplay of public/hegemonic and private/grassroots discourse in social media and online forums that feature voices of ‘ordinary people’
    • deal with methodological questions of mining and annotating data from online and social media platforms
    • present case studies based on corpora of social media and online interactive communication
    • discuss specific linguistic features, practices and phenomena of social media and online interactive communication

    Click to view the programme

     

  • Wed
    19
    Nov
    2014
    1:50pm - 5:00pmLancaster University, Faraday, Seminar Room 3

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) in association with the Lancaster University Department of Linguistics and English Language (LAEL) will be hosting a Symposium on Corpus Methods and Health Communication on 19 November 2014. The programme is as follows:

    1.50-2.00

    Opening: Elena Semino

    2.00-2.30

    Veronika Koller (Lancaster University) – Metaphor and end-of-life care

    2.30-3.00

    Gavin Brookes (University of Nottingham) – Discourses of Diabulimia: a corpus-based approach to online health communication

    3.00-3.30

    Tea/coffee

    3.30-4.00

    Karen Donnelly (Lancaster University) – "I've come to view myself as either a clinical patient, mother-without-a-baby, or complete failure." - representations of the infertile self

    4.00-4.30

    Elena Semino (Lancaster University) – Corpus methods and narratives of autism and schizophrenia

    4.30-5.00

    Nana Aba A. Amfo (University of Ghana) – Doctor-patient  discourses in psychiatric care in Akan speaking communities

    5.00-5.30

    General discussion and closing

    Fifteen places are available, and will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. Please contact Elena Semino by 12th November: e.semino@lancaster.ac.uk

  • Wed
    26
    Nov
    2014
    4:00 pmCounty South C89, Lancaster University, UK

    Dora Alexopoulou (Cambridge)
    Joint work with J Geertzen, A Korhonen and D Meurers

    The emergence of online EFL teaching  platforms offering teaching and learning to students around the globe results in unprecedented amounts of learner production data: data can come from  rich task sets across the proficiency spectrum and learners from a variety of linguistic, educational and cultural backgrounds. Exploiting such datasets opens important opportunities for SLA research and, in particular, linking SLA findings to  second language teaching. But at the same time, such datasets have all the pitfalls of big data: a range of variables standardly controlled for in carefully designed data collections (e.g. task sets) are not considered. Access to unprecedented numbers of learners is set against lack of rich learner metadata targeted in typical data collections. In addition, the very context of production poses  arbitrary constraints (e.g. word limits on writings). Last, but not least, the size of such datasets brings new challenges  for extracting information and addressing the noisy aspects of the data. 

    Can we then  use such data for SLA research, crucially, to link SLA findings to teaching second languages? I will argue that Natural Language Processing (NLP) tools can help us address many of the methodological issues and  will show that we can  obtain valuable information for SLA research. I will use the EF-Cambridge Open Language Database (EFCAMDAT) as an example of a big data resource.  I will focus on the  the developmental trajectory of Relative Clauses (RCs) as a study case and consider specific issues that can affect the developmental picture, such as task effects, formulaic language and national language effects. I will conclude by showing  that not only we can arrive at reliable generalisations about RC development based on a resource like EFCAMDAT,  but we can also obtain new generalisations, a fact strongly indicating the potential of big educational data for SLA research.

  • Fri
    30
    Jan
    2015
    Lancaster University, FASS Building, Meeting Room 2-3

    On Friday 30th January 2015, The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science is organizing a seminar with a series of talks on Chinese linguistics from both international and Lancaster University speakers. The seminar will take place at Lancaster University, FASS Building, Meeting Room 2-3. All are welcome to attend. The full programme can be found below:

    Time

    Speaker

    Affiliation

    Title of talk

    13.00 – 13.30

    Hongyin Tao

    University of California Los Angeles

    Corpus Linguistics and Null Elements

    13.30 – 14.00

    Yueguo Gu

    The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

    Multimodal corpus linguistics approach to child language development

    14.00 – 14.30

    Andrew Hardie

    Lancaster University

    Multidimensional analysis for the masses

    14.30 – 15.00

    Tea break

     

     

    15.00 – 15.30

    Hai Xu

    Guangdong University of Foreign Studies

    Building a Learner Corpus of Chinese: A Preliminary Report

    15.30 – 16.00

    Paul Rayson and Scott Piao

    Lancaster University

    Semantic tagging in Chinese

    16.00 – 16.30

    Jiajin Xu

    Beijing Foreign Studies University

    Chinese Corpus Torch Relay: From LCMC to ToRCH2009

    16.30 – 17.00

    Vittorio Tantucci

    Lancaster University

    The anti-resultative aktionsart of the Mandarin V- guo construction as a lexical source of evidentiality: A corpus-based study.

  • Wed
    27
    May
    2015
    Sun
    31
    May
    2015
    Trier

    Words, words, words – corpora and lexis

    The following scholars have far confirmed their participation in the conference as plenary speakers:

    • Kate Burridge, Monash University 
    • Thomas Herbst, Erlangen University
    • Graeme Trousdale, Edinburgh University
    • Edmund Weiner, Oxford University / OED

    The conference will follow the regular ICAME format: On Wednesday afternoon, we will start with one or several pre-conference workshops, and the day will end with a first plenary and a reception at the "Electoral Palace" (Kurfürstliches Palais) - one of the most beautiful rococo palaces in the world. On Friday afternoon, the conference excursion will take us to Bernkastel and its surroundings, and will of course also include a boat trip. The conference will end at lunchtime on Sunday.

    Trier is Germany's oldest city. It boasts a number of impressive UNESCO World Heritage sites dating back to Roman times, and accompanying partners will find plenty of interesting things to explore. The greater Trier region is also known for its excellent wine and beautiful scenery. 

    Official website: ICAME36

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the CASS Summer School

    The ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences was inaugurated in 2013; the 2015 event is the third in the series.

    This summer school takes place under the aegis of CASS, a new ESRC research centre bringing a new method in the study of language – the corpus approach – to a range of social sciences. CASS is investigating the use and manipulation of language in society in a host of areas of pressing concern, including climate change, hate crime and education.

    A crucial part of the CASS remit is to provide researchers across the social sciences with the skills needed to apply the tools and techniques of corpus linguistics to the research questions that matter in their own discipline. To help achieve this aim, we have founded – and will continue to run on a sustained basis – the CASS Summer School, in order to foster graduate students and other junior researchers in developing these skills.

    Like CASS itself, this Summer School is funded and sponsored by the Economic and Social Research Council.

    Who is the CASS summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior social scientists – especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any of the social science disciplines. Anyone with an interest in the analysis of social issues via text and discourse – especially on a large scale – will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in the CASS Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does the CASS Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Dana Gablasova — Collecting corpus data
    • Amanda Potts — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: introduction for social scientists
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: critical considerations
    • Paul Rayson — Semantic annotation and key domains
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Amanda Potts — Language and the law

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    An important note

    The ESRC Summer School syllabus changes slightly from year to year, but the majority of its contents are fixed, and begin at the basic level. Therefore, no one who has previously participated in this summer school is eligible to take the course again.

    How to apply

    The CASS Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the UCREL Summer School

    The UCREL Summer School 2015 is the fifth event in a highly successful series that began in 2011. Sponsored by UCREL at Lancaster University – one of the world's leading and longest-established centres for corpus-based research – its aim is to support students of language and linguistics in the development of advanced skills in corpus methods.

    The UCREL Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, and others) who require in-depth knowledge of corpus-based methodologies for their degree projects. It is not aimed at raw beginners, but rather at students who have at least some introductory experience of analysis using language corpora, and who wish to expand their knowledge of key issues and techniques in cutting-edge corpus research.

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The instructors include, as well as speakers from Lancaster University, external guest speakers who are prominent specialists in their respective fields. In the 2015 syllabus, speakers, and their session titles, include:

    • Alistair Baron — Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Vaclav Brezina — Understanding statistics for corpus analysis Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis
    • Claire Hardaker — Applying corpus methods in forensic linguistics
    • Andrew Hardie — The statistics of collocation; and Part-of-speech taggers: how they work, and how they go wrong
    • John Flowerdew — Corpora and academic discourse
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Yukio Tono — Error annotations in learner corpus research: approach, method, and technique

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School

    The Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is a new addition to the annual set of summer schools for 2015. It is jointly sponsored by the UCREL and CASS research centres at Lancaster University.

    This summer school offers a practical introduction to the statistical procedures that can be used for analysis of linguistic data compiled into language corpora. The curriculum provides an overview of the main statistical procedures used in the field of corpus linguistics together with simple examples of application of these methods.

    The “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and others) who wish to learn about the use of statistics to explore language corpora. It is taught by Dr. Vaclav Brezina with contributions from other staff from Lancaster University and members of the CASS Challenge Panel.

    The summer school does not require any prior knowledge of statistics; however, it does assume that participants have some experience of corpus linguistics at least at a basic level.

    The following topics will be covered (some shared with the Corpus Linguistics Summer School):

    • An introduction to understanding statistics for corpus analysis
    • Frequency and dispersion; descriptive and inferential statistics
    • The statistics of collocation
    • Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Null hypothesis significance testing and effect sizes
    • Inter-rater agreement
    • Historical corpora and time series analysis
    • Sampling methods and representativeness
    • Statistics in corpus-based sociolinguistics
    • Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when finalised.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL/CASS Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is a new addition to our annual event for 2015.

    About this Summer School

    Across the Arts and Humanities, a number of parallel trends are developing new methods, especially digital methods, for reading text and texts. We see this in the form of the Digital Humanities enterprise, but also in renewed interest in different forms of Distant Reading.

    Thus there exists a growing need for advanced digital-methods training for Arts and Humanities researchers – especially but not only in the fields of History and Literary Studies, where the large-scale analysis of textual databases is increasingly important. Meanwhile, a set of effective tools and techniques have been developed within the discipline of Corpus Linguisticswhich can answer this methodological need. In particular they allow jointly qualitative-quantitative analyses which go beyond statistical summary to a critical engagement with text and context.

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities has been inaugurated to help explore and extend the benefits of these approaches for researchers, particularly PhD students and other junior researchers, in arts and humanities fields.

    The summer school's syllabus draws on expertise from across several departments at Lancaster University – History, English and Creative Writing, Linguistics and English Language, and Computing and Communications. Lancaster's UCREL research centre has been at the forefront of the field of Corpus Linguistics since its foundation in the 1970s, and is now a leading centre for the development of corpus methods in other fields across the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.

    Who is this summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior arts and humanities researchers – especially but not only PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any discipline. Anyone in these fields with an interest in novel methodologies, digital humanities, distant reading, “big data” or generally in the use of large textual databases such as EEBO-TCP, newspaper archives, and so on, will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in this Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does this Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The initial sessions on basic, foundational methods are conducted jointly with the co-located ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Science. These introductory sessions are followed by a series of discussions of advanced contemproary research using corpus methods in the humanities: conceptual early modern literary studies, and Shakespearian stylistics more specifically. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Dana Gablasova — Collecting corpus data
    • Amanda Potts — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Tony McEnery/Helen Baker — Studying social history with corpora: prostitution in the 17th century
    • Alison Findlay — Using corpora in early modern Literary Studies
    • Alistair Baron — Spelling variation: problems, analysis and solutions
    • Stephen Pumprey — Studying conceptual history using EEBO-TCP
    • Jonathan Culpeper — Exploring Shakespeare's language with corpus techniques

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    This Summer School is an intensive, hands-on introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems aimed at PhD students and other junior researchers in the digital humanities.

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is the field of geography devoted to the visualisation, in the form of maps, of non-visual data sources. These data sources can range from statistical databases to corpora of literary texts.

    The Summer School in GIS for the Digital Humanities is sponsored by the European Research Council as part of the five-year project Spatial Humanities: Texts, Geographic Information Systems and Places. It is taught by Prof. Ian Gregory and Dr. Catherine Porter.

    • Prof. Gregory is the principle investigator of the Spatial Humanities project, and a leading specialist in GIS and its application across the social sciences and humanities. He is the author (with P. S. Ell) of the book Historical GIS: Technologies, Methodologies, and Scholarship.
    • Dr. Porter is a research associate on the Spatial Humanities project. Her background is in geography, with a particular specialism in Goegraphic Information Systems. Her research interests include the application of GIS and various quantitative techniques in the digital humanities, historical geography, the history of cartography and how early maps may be interrogated using quantitative techniques.

    For more information, see http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/projects/spatialhum.wordpress/?page_id=53.

    Programme

    Over four days, a series of intensive lab-based sessions will be used to introduce GIS, from the basic concepts, to the use of key software including ArcGIS, to a consideration of approaches for applying GIS in different kinds of humanities research. The aim is to give participants the skills needed to exploit GIS techniques in their own research – allowing the spatial dimension to emerge in the study of digital humanities.

    Sessions include:

    • Introduction to GIS in the Humanities
    • Cartography in ArcGIS
    • Working with tabular data
    • Data integration through overlay and buffering
    • Places, coordinates and point data
    • Geo-referencing historical data
    • Geo-visualization using Google Earth

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    How to apply

    This Summer School event is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Mon
    20
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    24
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The eighth international Corpus Linguistics conference (CL2015) will be held at Lancaster University from Tuesday 21st July 2015 to Friday 24th July 2015, preceded by a workshop day on Monday 20th July.

    This series of conferences began with Corpus Linguistics 2001, an event celebrating the career of Professor Geoffrey Leech, on the occasion of his retirement. In August of 2014, we reported with great sadness Geoff's sudden death.

    Geoff was not only the founder of the UCREL research centre for corpus linguistics at Lancaster University, he was also the first Professor and founding Head of the Department of Linguistics and English Language. His contributions to linguistics – not only in corpus linguistics, but also in English grammar, pragmatics and stylistics – were immense. After his retirement, he not only continued his own research but also, characteristically, to provide advice, support and encouragement for students and junior colleagues. He is remembered as an inspirational teacher and mentor, and a kind and generous friend.

    By dedicating this eighth conference in the Corpus Linguistics series once again to a celebration of Geoff's life, his career, and his truly remarkable influence on the field, we once more pay tribute to, and commemorate, a remarkable intellect and a sorely-missed colleague.

    Plenary speakers

    We are delighted to announce that the following speakers have accepted our invitation to give plenary lectures at CL2015:

    More about the conference

    This conference is hosted by the UCREL research centre, which brings together the Department of Linguistics and English Language with the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster.

    For registration and more information, visit the conference's official website: http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/cl2015/

  • Fri
    18
    Sep
    2015
    ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University

    Communication about health and illness is both an opportunity and a challenge: successful communication can positively contribute to diagnosis, treatment and wellbeing; unsuccessful communication can hinder diagnosis and treatment, and cause or increase distress and anxiety.

    It is therefore no surprise that communication skills are increasingly part of medical training, and that there has recently been a surge of interest in the study of language and interaction in healthcare settings, for example in the areas of ‘medical humanities’, ‘health humanities’ and ‘narrative medicine’. Patients and carers also increasingly use online resources and online fora to obtain information and to interact with people who share similar experiences. This has considerably increased the amount of data available for analysis.

    The use of corpus-based methods in studying different aspects of health communication has also developed in recent years. The application of these methods has the potential to increase understanding of the experiences of patients, carers and health professionals, and to help tackle some of the communicative issues faced by members of all three groups.
    This free workshop provides an overview of the state of the art in corpus approaches to health communication. The four morning lectures will introduce four different corpusbased projects in different areas of health communication. The three afternoon workshops will provide the opportunity to practise the use of different corpus tools for the analysis of participants’ own data, or of data provided by the organisers.

    We welcome participants from all academic and practice backgrounds. Familiarity with corpus linguistic methods is not a requirement.

    Places are limited, and are allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. Please register online by clicking here: http://corpora.lancs.ac.uk/submission/registration.php?conference=13

  • Mon
    21
    Sep
    2015
    Lancaster University

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) and the Department of Sociology are pleased to announce a one-day symposium on Changing Climates and the Media taking place at Lancaster University on 21st Sep 2015.

    This is the end-of-grant event of the CASS project on Changing Climates. The symposium will bring together leading academics from various disciplines, community experts and the Environment Agency in a unique event to discuss recent research on climate change and the media from a wide range of perspectives. Presentations will cover various countries, including Brazil, UK, Germany and Italy. Click here to see details of the programme.

    We are all looking forward very much to this event.

  • Thu
    12
    Nov
    2015
    16:00 - 21:00International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester

    CASS is excited to announce an upcoming event at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester on Thursday 12th November from 4pm-9pm.

    “Language matters: communication, culture and society” is a mini-series of four informal talks showcasing the impact of language on society. The timely themes will be presented in an approachable manner that will be accessible to a general audience, stimulating to novice language researchers, and interesting to social scientists. Topics include hate speech, myths about impoliteness, and online aggression. Each talk incorporates an element of social science research beyond linguistics and we will take this opportunity to emphasise the importance of interdisciplinary work.

    Afterwards, the audience will be invited to a drinks reception, during which they will have the opportunity to engage further with speakers and to network with guests.

    In a single event, participants will have the opportunity to hear renowned scholars talk about their lives, their work, and what they find most interesting about the relationship between language and society. Talks are short, energetic, and pitched for a general audience.

    Speakers

    • “Impoliteness: The language of offence” - Jonathan Culpeper
    • “Vile Words. What is the case for criminalizing everyday hate speech as hate crime?” - Paul Iganski
    • “The ethics of investigating online aggression: where does ‘virtual’ end and ‘reality’ begin?” - Claire Hardaker
    • “Spoken English in UK society” - Robbie Love

    This free event is part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science 2015. Please register online to book your place.

    For a taste of what’s in store, please see this video recap of a similar event held in London last year. For more information, please visit the ESRC website

  • Sat
    28
    Nov
    2015
    Cardiff University

    CLS10 will be hosted by the Centre for Language and Communication Research (CLCR) at Cardiff University, Wales on Saturday 28th November 2015. CLCR works at the interface of theoretical and applied research in the domains of identity and culture, linguistic knowledge, and professional and public discourse.

    The aim of CLS10 is to draw our attention to the ways in which corpus-based methods can be utilised to examine features of public and professional discourse. It also focuses on the application of such research to real life situations and problems. We welcome proposals for papers covering topics such as:

    • Healthcare communication; doctor-patient interaction; health questionnaires and surveys;
    • Language and the law; courtroom discourse; analysis of trials and judgements;
    • Academic discourse; language of the classroom; teacher-student exchanges;
    • Language in the media; newsworthiness; news production and reception;
    • Corporate communication; corporate reports; financial disclosures; discourses of corporate risk, security, and apologies;
    • Ethical considerations in analysis of professional and public discourse;
    • Exploration of the erosion of public/private distinctions in modern discourse;

    Presentations on methodological aspects of collecting, cleaning, and making use of corpora of professional and public discourse will also be considered.

    Deadline for receipt of abstracts: 10th August 2015

    Abstract requirements:

    Individual papers have 25 minutes: 20 for the presentation, 5 for questions. Please format your abstract in the following way:

    • Abstracts must be written in Times New Roman 12 (do not use all caps, no bold print)
    • Text should be 300 words maximum (including references, if any)
    • Abstracts should be submitted via email to Dawn Knight: KnightD5@Cardiff.ac.uk

    Registration:

    In keeping with all Corpus Linguistics in the South events, this is a FREE event. A light buffet lunch will be provided, but participants must pay for their own travel costs. There is a very limited number of places for participants and attendance at the event will operate on a first-come first-served basis. After the deadline for abstracts has closed and papers accepted, information regarding the registration process for speakers and participants will be circulated.

    Further information about CLCR is available here

  • Mon
    22
    Feb
    2016
    13:00 - 17:00Lancaster University

    We will be running a launch event and workshop for a new software tool that we have created called FireAnt. The event and workshop will be held from 13:00 to 17:00 on Monday 22nd February 2016 here at Lancaster University.

    FireAnt was created by Laurence Anthony as part of the 2015 ESRC-funded CASS-affiliated DOOM project on social media analysis. FireAnt is a free and easy-to-use tool designed to help corpus linguists and social scientists analyze Twitter and other social network data without the need for programming or database management skills. The following features of the tool will be explored in this workshop:

    • import different formats of data (e.g. Twitter data in JSON format, Reddit data in CSV format, etc.)
    • search that data and its associated metadata in a variety of ways (e.g., retrieve all tweets containing #blacklivesmatter sent in December 2015)
    • export the results to other formats including a plain text file for “standard” corpus analysis, an Excel/CSV file for statistical analysis, a timeline chart, and a network graph

    We will be providing lunch at the start of the event and all materials for the workshop (including the software and help guide) on a USB drive. The schedule for the day can be found below.

    SCHEDULE

    Time Agenda
    1315-1415 PDR Room: Lunch
    1415-1430 Introduction, log on, etc.
    1430-1530 FireAnt basics
    1530-1545 Refuel: Coffee break
    1545-1645 FireAnt advanced
    1645-1700 Q&As, requests, bouquets, encores

    Please note that places are extremely limited and must be booked in advance. If you would like to attend, please email Claire Hardaker (c.hardaker@lancaster.ac.uk) in the first instance.

  • Tue
    23
    Feb
    2016
    10:00 - 17:00University of Cape Coast

    This free one-day workshop, arranged jointly by Lancaster’s CASS research centre and the University of Cape Coast, consists of a series of introductory lectures and practical sessions on topics in corpus linguistics and the use of corpus techniques in applied linguistic analysis.

    We welcome everyone who wants to learn more about this versatile methodology for language analysis; no specialised knowledge about language corpora is required, but basic familiarity with computers is assumed. The workshop focuses on analysis techniques and tools which participants will be able to apply to their own texts and corpora.

    Registration in advance is required, as places are limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment; registration will close on February 17th 2016, or when the event is full.

    The workshop will be taught by Andrew Hardie, Dana Gablasova, and Mark McGlashan (Lancaster University).

    Topics to be covered:

    • Introduction to corpus linguistics
    • Corpora and language learning
    • Corpora and discourse
    • Using the AntConc software
    • Using the GraphColl software

    To register for free, please click on this link (or copy the address to your browser): http://corpora.lancs.ac.uk/submission/registration.php?conference=17

    • Date: Tuesday 23rd February 2016; begins 10 a.m., ends 5 p.m.
    • Location: University of Cape Coast
    • NB: Lunch will be provided.

    If you have any queries about this event please email cass@lancaster.ac.uk

  • Fri
    26
    Feb
    2016
    09:00 - 16:00UGCS, University of Ghana, Legon

    This free one-day workshop, arranged jointly by Lancaster’s CASS research centre and the School of Languages of the University of Ghana, consists of a series of introductory lectures and practical sessions on topics in corpus linguistics and the use of corpus techniques in applied linguistic analysis.

    We welcome everyone who wants to learn more about this versatile methodology for language analysis; no specialised knowledge about language corpora is required, but basic familiarity with computers is assumed. The workshop focuses on analysis techniques and tools which participants will be able to apply to their own texts and corpora.

    Registration in advance is required, as places are limited. Please register early to avoid disappointment; registration will close on February 17th 2016, or when the event is full.

    The workshop will be taught by Andrew Hardie, Dana Gablasova, and Mark McGlashan (Lancaster University).

    Topics to be covered:

    • Introduction to corpus linguistics
    • Corpora and language learning
    • Corpora and discourse
    • Using the AntConc software
    • Using the GraphColl software

    To register for free, please click on this link (or copy the address to your browser): http://corpora.lancs.ac.uk/submission/registration.php?conference=16

    • Date: Friday 26th February 2016; begins 9 a.m., ends 4 p.m.
    • Location: UGCS, University of Ghana, Legon
    • NB: Lunch will be provided.
  • Mon
    07
    Mar
    2016
    13:00 - 17:00Green Lane Conference Centre, Lancaster House Hotel, Lancaster University

    A workshop organised by British Library Labs and the ERC funded, ‘Spatial Humanities: Texts, GIS & Places’ at Lancaster University, as part of the British Library Labs Roadshow (2016).

    The workshop will showcase some of the British Library’s digital content and data, addressing some of the challenges and issues of working with it and how interesting and exciting projects from researchers, artists, and entrepreneurs have been developed via the annual British Library Labs Competition and Awards. This will be followed by presentations about research at Lancaster University. Finally, the session will end with an ‘Ideas Lab’ encouraging participants to explore, experiment and think of ideas of what they might do with the British Library’s digital content and data. A panel will give feedback on the ideas and there will be a British Library goody bag for the best one!

    Date and Time:
    Monday 7th March 2016,1300-1700

    Cost:
    Free

    Location:
    Green Lane Conference Centre, Lancaster House Hotel, Lancaster University

    Map:
    Please refer to the following map detailing how to get to the event.

    BL Labs Roadshow (2016)

    Hundreds of thousands of digital items and objects are being created and collected for researchers to use such as digitised manuscripts, sheet music, newspapers, maps, archived websites, radio, performances, TV news broadcasts, and artworks, as well as the more expected items like scanned versions of books.

    This wonderful cacophony of content is having a significant effect on how institutions like the British Library support the research needs of their users. Will people discover new information when they are no longer restricted to viewing a single page from a single book at a time? How can the BL build systems that provide a coherent route across its content, regardless of whether it is a televised news report or a unique signature drawn in the margins of a map? How can we use crowd-sourced information, computer vision and machine-learning techniques to provide people with better tools to better judge and interpret the context of illustration or work? How can we exploit animations and interactive infographics to better convey the information found in our holdings?

    This is the research space that British Library Labs explores and we want to encourage researchers at Lancaster University to work with us and share their research questions and innovative ideas around this.

    Programme:

    1300  Introduction
    Professor Ian Gregory, Professor of Digital Humanities, Department of History, Lancaster University.

    1305  'Using corpus linguistics to investigate nineteenth-century newspapers: Ireland and the Irish’
    Professor Tony McEnery, Director of the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science, Lancaster University.

    1330  A demonstration of CQPweb and the British Library nineteenth-century newspaper collection.
    Dr Andrew Hardie, Reader in Linguistics, Lancaster University.

    1400  British Library Labs
    Mahendra Mahey, Manager of British Library Labs.
    Ben O'Steen, Technical Lead of British Library Labs.
    Hana Lewis, Project Officer of British Library Labs.
    Dr Bob Nicholson, Edge Hill University.

    The British Library Labs project supports and inspires scholars to use the British Library’s incredible digital collections in exciting and innovative ways for their research, through various activities such as competitions, awards, events and projects.

    Labs will highlight some of the work that they and others are doing around digital content in libraries and also talk about ways to encourage researchers to engage with the British Library. They will present information on the annual BL Labs Competition, which closes this year on 11th April 2016. Through the Competition, Labs encourages researchers to submit their important research question or creative idea which uses the British Library’s digital content and data. Two Competition winners then work in residence at the British Library for five months and then showcase the results of their work at the annual Labs Symposium in November 2016.

    Labs will also discuss the annual BL Labs Awards which recognises outstanding work already completed, that has used the British Library’s digital collections and data. This year, the Awards will commend work in at four key areas: Research, Artistic, Commercial and Teaching / Learning. The deadline for entering the BL Labs Awards this year is 5th September 2016.

    Labs will further present information on various projects such as the ‘Mechanical Curator’ and other interesting experiments using the British Library’s digital content and data.

    1500  Coffee break

    1515  Examination of British Library data and previous Labs ideas
    Labs Team

    Labs will be coming along with terabytes of the British Library’s digital data on the day which the team will give an overview of, highlighting some of the challenges faced when working with “messy” data.

    1530  Ideas Lab
    Labs Team

    Labs will present an outline of the various ideas and suggestions from other researchers that have been made which explore working with the British Library’s digital content and data. The delegates will then have the opportunity to work in small groups and come up with their own ideas. The team and Lancaster staff will be on hand to help and advise.

    1630  Pitching ideas to the panel
    Lancaster University and Labs Team

    Each group will pitch their ideas to the Labs and Lancaster University panel who will give feedback on how they might be implemented - and there’s even the chance to win a goody bag!

    1700  Finish

     

    Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/experimenting-with-the-british-librarys-digital-content-and-data-for-your-research-lancaster-tickets-21004019588

  • Fri
    29
    Apr
    2016
    9:00 - 13:00Lancaster University, County South, room C89

    This informal half-day symposium will take place at Lancaster University on 29th April 2016. The aim of the symposium is to bring together researchers, students and teachers who are interested in Chinese linguistics and the use of corpus techniques. As part of the symposium, Guangwai Lancaster Chinese learner corpus (GLC) will be introduced.  GLC is a new learner corpus developed jointly by the Guangdong University of Foreign Studies and Lancaster University. The corpus will become publicly available towards the end of this year.

    Venue: Lancaster University, County South, room C89

    Date: 29 April 2016, 9a.m.-1p.m.

    Online registration is now open.

    Contact: Vaclav Brezina (CASS), v.brezina@lancaster.ac.uk

    Programme:

    • Introduction
    • Presentations
    • Roundtable discussion
    • Corpus demonstration

    Guest presenter:  Prof. Hai Xu, GDUFS (via skype)

    Detailed programme is available here. Lunch and tea/coffee will be provided.

    This event is supported by the British Academy International Partnership & Mobility Scheme and the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science.

  • Thu
    19
    May
    2016
    13:00 - 17:00Furness Lecture Theatre 3, Lancaster University

    The aim of the event is to bring together researchers with an interest in combining methods from corpus linguistics and psycholinguistics. In particular, there will be a focus on experimental psycholinguistics. It is set to be an exciting afternoon consisting of four 40-minute presentations from both internal (Professor Padraic Monaghan; Jennifer Hughes) and external speakers (Professor Michaela Mahlberg; Dr Phil Durrant). You can read more about the presentations here.

    Venue: Furness Lecture Theatre 3, Lancaster University

    Date: Thursday 19th May 2016, 1-5pm

    The event is free to attend and is open to both internal and external attendees. If you are an external guest, please email j.j.hughes@lancaster.ac.uk so we know that you intend to come.

  • Tue
    12
    Jul
    2016
    Fri
    15
    Jul
    2016
    Lancaster University

    Lancaster University is pleased to offer six free training events that cover the techniques of corpus linguistics, computational analysis of language and geographical information systems (see the description of the individual schools below). The schools include both lectures and practical sessions that introduce the latest developments in the field and practical applications of cutting-edge analytical techniques. The summer schools are taught by leading experts in the field both from Lancaster University and other institutions (CASS Challenge Panel).

    The summer schools are intended primarily for postgraduate research students but applications from Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and others will also be considered.

    Dates: 12 - 15 July (four days)

    Venue: Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK

    The summer schools are free to attend; the participants will arrange their own travel and accommodation (for travel details click here).

    The following six Summer Schools will run in July 2016:

    For further details, click through to each Summer School's full description. Any queries can be directed to the Summer School administrator, Abi Hawtin (a.hawtin@lancaster.ac.uk).

  • Mon
    21
    Nov
    2016
    Tue
    22
    Nov
    2016
    Macquarie University, Balaclava Road, North Ryde, NSW, 2109, Australia, http://www.mq.edu.au/

    When: 21 November 2016 to 22 November 2016

    Where: Macquarie University, Balaclava Road, North Ryde, NSW, 2109, Australia http://www.mq.edu.au/

    CASS, Lancaster University and the Department of Linguistics at Macquarie University are organising a free two-day workshop in Sydney, Australia. The workshop offers a series of sessions on topics in corpus linguistics and the application of corpus techniques in studies of discourse and language learning.

    To register for the workshop, click here.

    The workshop will be followed by the Festival of Methods, an informal mini-conference showcasing different types of corpus-based research related to the topic of “Australia and Australian voices” in language corpora.

    To submit an abstract for consideration for the Festival of Methods, click here.

    Registration in advance is required, as places are limited.

    Programme:

    Monday 21 November Session
    9.00 – 9.30 Registration
    9.30- 10.30 Tony McEnery: Corpus linguistics:  beyond the basics and the future of the field [lecture]
    10.30 - 11.00 BREAK
    11.00 - 12.00 Vaclav Brezina: ‘Beautiful evidence’ in Corpus linguistics: Statistics and data visualization [lecture]
    12.00 - 13.00 LUNCH
    13.00 - 14.00 Vaclav Brezina et al.: Corpus techniques I: Exploring corpora and visualizing results [practical session]
    14.00 - 15.00 Dana Gablasova: Corpus linguistics and language learning [lecture]
    15.00 - 15.30 BREAK
    15.30 - 16.30 Dana Gablasova et al.: Corpus techniques II: Corpora and language teaching [practical session]
    Tue 22 November Session
    9.30- 10.30 Paul Baker: Corpus-based discourse analysis: Critical considerations [lecture]
    10.30 - 11.00 BREAK
    11.00 - 12.00 Paul Baker et al.: Corpus techniques III: Corpus-based discourse analysis [practical session]
    12.00 - 13.00 LUNCH
    13.00 - 16.00 The Festival of Methods – programme TBC  
    16.00 – 16.15 Closing remarks  

    Festival of Methods: “Australia and Australian voices”

     We have introduced an innovative element into the series of corpus linguistic workshops in which we ask participants to bring their own ideas, data and results to discuss the effects of our choice of tools, methods and approaches. We call this new element the Festival of Methods because we hope it will be an engaging exploration and celebration of the range of methods of linguistic analysis we have available.

    For the 2016 event at Macquarie University, Sydney, the Festival of Methods task is as follows:

    Participants will be given access to the corpus and the software (see above), and are encouraged to approach the topic from any aspect. They may make as little or as much use of corpus tools as they wish, and approaches using different analytical frames are very welcome. Collaborative contributions are also welcome.

    Participation

    We invite submissions of abstracts for short (10 min.) presentations of work in progress, which will stimulate general discussion on the topic.

    If you would like to participate in the Festival, please submit a short abstract (max. 200 words) by 30th September 2016. To submit your abstract, please click here.

  • Tue
    27
    Jun
    2017
    Fri
    30
    Jun
    2017
    Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK

    Lancaster University is pleased to offer six free training events that cover the techniques of corpus linguistics, computational analysis of language and geographical information systems (see the description of the individual schools below). The schools include both lectures and practical sessions that introduce the latest developments in the field and practical applications of cutting-edge analytical techniques. The summer schools are taught by leading experts in the field both from Lancaster University and other institutions (CASS Challenge Panel).

    The summer schools are intended primarily for postgraduate research students but applications from Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and others will also be considered.


    Application: The application process for the 2017 summer schools is now open. Click here to apply online. (The application process closes on 1st May 2017 or when a maximum number of registrations is reached.)

    N.B. Since the places in the summer schools are limited, we recommend applying early. Applications will be evaluated on a rolling basis.


    The summer schools are free to attend; the participants will arrange their own travel and accommodation (for travel details click here).

    The following six Summer Schools will run in June 2017:

    For further details, click through to each Summer School's full description. Any queries can be directed to the Summer School administrator, Abi Hawtin (a.hawtin@lancaster.ac.uk).