Events

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the CASS Summer School

    The ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Sciences was inaugurated in 2013; the 2015 event is the third in the series.

    This summer school takes place under the aegis of CASS, a new ESRC research centre bringing a new method in the study of language – the corpus approach – to a range of social sciences. CASS is investigating the use and manipulation of language in society in a host of areas of pressing concern, including climate change, hate crime and education.

    A crucial part of the CASS remit is to provide researchers across the social sciences with the skills needed to apply the tools and techniques of corpus linguistics to the research questions that matter in their own discipline. To help achieve this aim, we have founded – and will continue to run on a sustained basis – the CASS Summer School, in order to foster graduate students and other junior researchers in developing these skills.

    Like CASS itself, this Summer School is funded and sponsored by the Economic and Social Research Council.

    Who is the CASS summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior social scientists – especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any of the social science disciplines. Anyone with an interest in the analysis of social issues via text and discourse – especially on a large scale – will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in the CASS Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does the CASS Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Vaclav Brezina (TBC) — Collecting corpus data
    • (TBC) — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: introduction for social scientists
    • Paul Baker — Corpus-based discourse analysis: critical considerations
    • Paul Rayson — Semantic annotation and key domains
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Amanda Potts — Language and the law

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    An important note

    The ESRC Summer School syllabus changes slightly from year to year, but the majority of its contents are fixed, and begin at the basic level. Therefore, no one who has previously participated in this summer school is eligible to take the course again.

    How to apply

    The CASS Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the UCREL Summer School

    The UCREL Summer School 2015 is the fifth event in a highly successful series that began in 2011. Sponsored by UCREL at Lancaster University – one of the world's leading and longest-established centres for corpus-based research – its aim is to support students of language and linguistics in the development of advanced skills in corpus methods.

    The UCREL Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, and others) who require in-depth knowledge of corpus-based methodologies for their degree projects. It is not aimed at raw beginners, but rather at students who have at least some introductory experience of analysis using language corpora, and who wish to expand their knowledge of key issues and techniques in cutting-edge corpus research.

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The instructors include, as well as speakers from Lancaster University, external guest speakers who are prominent specialists in their respective fields. In the 2015 syllabus, speakers, and their session titles, include:

    • Alistair Baron — Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Vaclav Brezina — Understanding statistics for corpus analysis Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis
    • Claire Hardaker — Applying corpus methods in forensic linguistics
    • Andrew Hardie — The statistics of collocation; and Part-of-speech taggers: how they work, and how they go wrong
    • John Flowerdew — Corpora and academic discourse
    • Elena Semino — Corpus-based approaches to analysing metaphor in discourse
    • Yukio Tono — Error annotations in learner corpus research: approach, method, and technique

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL Summer School is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    About the “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School

    The Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is a new addition to the annual set of summer schools for 2015. It is jointly sponsored by the UCREL and CASS research centres at Lancaster University.

    This summer school offers a practical introduction to the statistical procedures that can be used for analysis of linguistic data compiled into language corpora. The curriculum provides an overview of the main statistical procedures used in the field of corpus linguistics together with simple examples of application of these methods.

    The “Statistics for Corpus Linguistics” Summer School is intended primarily for postgraduate research students (and secondarily for Masters-level students, postdoctoral researchers, senior researchers, and others) who wish to learn about the use of statistics to explore language corpora. It is taught by Dr. Vaclav Brezina with contributions from other staff from Lancaster University and members of the CASS Challenge Panel.

    The summer school does not require any prior knowledge of statistics; however, it does assume that participants have some experience of corpus linguistics at least at a basic level.

    The following topics will be covered (some shared with the Corpus Linguistics Summer School):

    • An introduction to understanding statistics for corpus analysis
    • Frequency and dispersion; descriptive and inferential statistics
    • The statistics of collocation
    • Advanced corpus queries and the use of regular expressions
    • Null hypothesis significance testing and effect sizes
    • Inter-rater agreement
    • Historical corpora and time series analysis
    • Sampling methods and representativeness
    • Statistics in corpus-based sociolinguistics
    • Register variation and multi-dimensional analysis

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when finalised.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The UCREL/CASS Summer School in Statistics for Corpus Linguistics is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is a new addition to our annual event for 2015.

    About this Summer School

    Across the Arts and Humanities, a number of parallel trends are developing new methods, especially digital methods, for reading text and texts. We see this in the form of the Digital Humanities enterprise, but also in renewed interest in different forms of Distant Reading.

    Thus there exists a growing need for advanced digital-methods training for Arts and Humanities researchers – especially but not only in the fields of History and Literary Studies, where the large-scale analysis of textual databases is increasingly important. Meanwhile, a set of effective tools and techniques have been developed within the discipline of Corpus Linguisticswhich can answer this methodological need. In particular they allow jointly qualitative-quantitative analyses which go beyond statistical summary to a critical engagement with text and context.

    The Lancaster Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities has been inaugurated to help explore and extend the benefits of these approaches for researchers, particularly PhD students and other junior researchers, in arts and humanities fields.

    The summer school's syllabus draws on expertise from across several departments at Lancaster University – History, English and Creative Writing, Linguistics and English Language, and Computing and Communications. Lancaster's UCREL research centre has been at the forefront of the field of Corpus Linguistics since its foundation in the 1970s, and is now a leading centre for the development of corpus methods in other fields across the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences.

    Who is this summer school for?

    This event is aimed at junior arts and humanities researchers – especially but not only PhD students and postdoctoral researchers – in any discipline. Anyone in these fields with an interest in novel methodologies, digital humanities, distant reading, “big data” or generally in the use of large textual databases such as EEBO-TCP, newspaper archives, and so on, will find this summer school of interest.

    Please note that we assume no knowledge of language and linguistics in general, or of corpus linguistics specifically, in this Summer School. If you are a linguist who already has some experience with corpus linguistics, the UCREL Summer School is a better event for you.

    What topics does this Summer School cover?

    The programme consists of a series of intensive two-hour sessions, some involving practical work, others more discussion-oriented. The initial sessions on basic, foundational methods are conducted jointly with the co-located ESRC Summer School in Corpus Approaches to Social Science. These introductory sessions are followed by a series of discussions of advanced contemproary research using corpus methods in the humanities: conceptual early modern literary studies, and Shakespearian stylistics more specifically. Speakers, and their (provisional) session titles, include:

    • Andrew Hardie — Introduction to corpus linguistics / Corpus tools and techniques
    • Vaclav Brezina (TBC) — Collecting corpus data
    • (TBC) — Foundational techniques: linking quantitative results to qualitative analysis
    • Tony McEnery — Foundational techniques: keywords
    • Claire Hardaker — Foundational techniques: collocation
    • Tony McEnery/Helen Baker — Studying social history with corpora: prostitution in the 17th century
    • Alison Findlay — Using corpora in early modern Literary Studies
    • Alistair Baron — Spelling variation: problems, analysis and solutions
    • Stephen Pumprey — Studying conceptual history using EEBO-TCP
    • Jonathan Culpeper — Exploring Shakespeare's language with corpus techniques

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    The full timetable will be made available on this page when completed.

    In addition, participants in this Summer School will have the opportunity to meet and consult with members of the CASS Challenge Panel, a group of prominent specialists in corpus methodology.

    How to apply

    The Summer School in Corpus Methods for the Humanities is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Tue
    14
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    17
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    This Summer School is an intensive, hands-on introduction to the use of Geographical Information Systems aimed at PhD students and other junior researchers in the digital humanities.

    Geographical Information Systems (GIS) is the field of geography devoted to the visualisation, in the form of maps, of non-visual data sources. These data sources can range from statistical databases to corpora of literary texts.

    The Summer School in GIS for the Digital Humanities is sponsored by the European Research Council as part of the five-year project Spatial Humanities: Texts, Geographic Information Systems and Places. It is taught by Prof. Ian Gregory and Dr. Catherine Porter.

    • Prof. Gregory is the principle investigator of the Spatial Humanities project, and a leading specialist in GIS and its application across the social sciences and humanities. He is the author (with P. S. Ell) of the book Historical GIS: Technologies, Methodologies, and Scholarship.
    • Dr. Porter is a research associate on the Spatial Humanities project. Her background is in geography, with a particular specialism in Goegraphic Information Systems. Her research interests include the application of GIS and various quantitative techniques in the digital humanities, historical geography, the history of cartography and how early maps may be interrogated using quantitative techniques.

    For more information, see http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fass/projects/spatialhum.wordpress/?page_id=53.

    Programme

    Over four days, a series of intensive lab-based sessions will be used to introduce GIS, from the basic concepts, to the use of key software including ArcGIS, to a consideration of approaches for applying GIS in different kinds of humanities research. The aim is to give participants the skills needed to exploit GIS techniques in their own research – allowing the spatial dimension to emerge in the study of digital humanities.

    Sessions include:

    • Introduction to GIS in the Humanities
    • Cartography in ArcGIS
    • Working with tabular data
    • Data integration through overlay and buffering
    • Places, coordinates and point data
    • Geo-referencing historical data
    • Geo-visualization using Google Earth

    There are additional daily lectures shared with the other four Summer School events, each illustrating cutting-edge research using corpus data:

    • Tony McEnery — Representations of Islam in the UK press
    • Ian Gregory — Using corpus data in Geographical Information Systems
    • Veronika Koller — Metaphor in the language surrounding end-of-life care

    How to apply

    This Summer School event is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited. For more details, click here.

  • Mon
    20
    Jul
    2015
    Fri
    24
    Jul
    2015
    Lancaster University, UK

    The eighth international Corpus Linguistics conference (CL2015) will be held at Lancaster University from Tuesday 21st July 2015 to Friday 24th July 2015, preceded by a workshop day on Monday 20th July.

    This series of conferences began with Corpus Linguistics 2001, an event celebrating the career of Professor Geoffrey Leech, on the occasion of his retirement. In August of 2014, we reported with great sadness Geoff's sudden death.

    Geoff was not only the founder of the UCREL research centre for corpus linguistics at Lancaster University, he was also the first Professor and founding Head of the Department of Linguistics and English Language. His contributions to linguistics – not only in corpus linguistics, but also in English grammar, pragmatics and stylistics – were immense. After his retirement, he not only continued his own research but also, characteristically, to provide advice, support and encouragement for students and junior colleagues. He is remembered as an inspirational teacher and mentor, and a kind and generous friend.

    By dedicating this eighth conference in the Corpus Linguistics series once again to a celebration of Geoff's life, his career, and his truly remarkable influence on the field, we once more pay tribute to, and commemorate, a remarkable intellect and a sorely-missed colleague.

    Plenary speakers

    We are delighted to announce that the following speakers have accepted our invitation to give plenary lectures at CL2015:

    More about the conference

    This conference is hosted by the UCREL research centre, which brings together the Department of Linguistics and English Language with the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster.

    For registration and more information, visit the conference's official website: http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/cl2015/