Events

  • Mon
    04
    Mar
    2019
    Wed
    06
    Mar
    2019
    Lancaster University - Conference Centre

    Collaborations between Linguistics and the Professions

    4th-6th March 2019, Lancaster University

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University, will hold a free event on interactions between linguists and private-sector organisations, on 4th, 5th and 6th March 2019. A series of invited speakers from academia and business will discuss experiences, challenges and opportunities in areas including publishing, IT, forensic analysis, organisational culture, marketing, financial reporting, and language teaching, learning and assessment.

    Thanks to funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), attendance is free, but registration in advance is required, as places are limited. It is possible to register for one, two or all three days of the event.

    You can apply to attend here, no later than 8th February. We will let you know as soon as possible if you have been able to secure a place.

    Organiser: Professor Elena Semino
    Contact for all enquiries: Isolde Van Dorst - i.vandorst@lancaster.ac.uk
    Venue: Training Room, Lancaster Conference Centre, Lancaster House Hotel. Directions to campus and campus map.


    Download the programme from here: CASS Business Boost event - programme

    March 2019

    9.00 Registration
    9.25 Welcome: Elena Semino
    9.30 Louise Mullany (School of English and Director of Linguistic Profiling for Professionals, University of Nottingham):

    Opportunities and Challenges: Linguistics as Consultancy

    10.10 Isobelle Clarke (Department of English Language and Linguistics, University of Birmingham):

    Investigative Linguistics in the Private Sector: Receiving Requests, Taking Cases and the Challenges in Building a Reputation

    10.50 Coffee
    11.10 Georgina Brown (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    Working with business to innovate new methodologies in forensic speech science

    11.50 Kenneth Church (Baidu Research):

    Corpus Methods in a Digitized World

    12.30 Lunch
    1.40 Steven Young (Department of Accounting and Finance, Lancaster University Management School):

    Unstructured Data in Financial Reporting: Implications for Practitioners and Policy Makers

    2.20 Claire Hardaker (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    The curious world of (forensic) consultancy research: or, knowing when to say “no thanks”

    3.00 Tea
    3.20 Patrick Hanks (Research Institute for Information and Language Processing, University of Wolverhampton):

    Greed, Risk, and Mutual Deception:  some indiscreet reminiscences 

    • Can academics work with publishers and IT companies?
    • Can publishers and IT companies work with universities?
    4.00 Tony McEnery (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    The ups and downs of engagement - linguistics and the impact agenda

    4.40 Concluding remarks
    5.00 Close

     

    5th March 2019

    9.15 Registration
    9.45 Welcome: Elena Semino
    9.50 Alison Mackey (Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University; Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    Applying second language research in the private sector: From tech companies to independent schools

    10.30 Coffee
    11.00 Abby Brody (Avenues: The World School):

    Linguistic research reshaping the private sector of education. A case study of Avenues: The World School

    11.40 Judit Kormos (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University)

    Promoting inclusive practices in educational publishing and second language assessment

    12.20 Lunch
    1.40 Claire Dembry (Cambridge University Press):

    ELT publishing and linguists: successes, challenges and future possibilities

    2.20 Vaclav Brezina (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    Corpora and language teaching and learning: Translating research into impact

    3.00 Tea
    3.30 Cathy Taylor (Trinity College London)

    The Spoken Learner Corpus (SLC) project: a collaboration between Trinity College London and CASS, Lancaster University

    4.10 John Pill (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    How test developers and domain experts collaborate to create relevant language tests

    4.50 Concluding remarks
    5.00 Close

     

    6th March 2019

    9.15 Registration
    9.45 Welcome: Elena Semino
    9.50 Colleen Cotter (School of Languages, Linguistics and Film, Queen Mary University of London):

    Journalists and academics talk about language: Bridging the "professional divide" 

    10.30 Coffee
    11.00 Veronika Koller (Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University):

    Healthcare, linguistics and consulting: opportunities and obstacles

    11.40 Jeannette Littlemore (Department of English Language and Linguistics, University of Birmingham):

    Working with marketing and communications agencies on their use of figurative messaging.

    12.20 Lunch
    1.50 Gill Ereaut (Linguistic Landscapes):

    Making organisational culture tangible through linguistics: practical consulting for organisations

    2.30 Sandra Pickering (Opento):

    Building compelling brands: the role of language in the marketing toolkit 

    3.10 Tea
    3.40 Dan McIntyre and Hazel Price (Department of Linguistics, University of Huddersfield):

    Language Unlocked: A Linguistic Consultancy

    4.20 Short break
    4.30 Deborah Tannen (Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University – via video link):

    Beyond the Academy: Communicating Linguistics to the Broader Public

    5.10 Concluding remarks
    5.30 Close

     

     

     

  • Thu
    07
    Mar
    2019
    Lancaster University

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University is organising a free half-day workshop on corpus-based approaches to language testing. The event offers a combination of two lectures and a practical session. The practical session focuses on major corpus techniques used in language assessment research and practice. The workshop is suitable for students, researchers and practitioners interested in language assessment, applied linguistics and corpus methods. No prior knowledge of corpus linguistics is required.  We are delighted that Dr Shelley Staples from the University of Arizona accepted the invitation to give a guest lecture at the event.

    The attendance is free, but registration in advance is required since the number of places is limited. Registration is now closed.

    Follow the event on twitter from 12pm UK time @CorpusSocialSci 

    The handout for the practical session is available for download.

     

     

     

    Programme

    11.30-12.00 Registration & Lunch FASS Reception
    12.00-12.55 Dana Gablasova:  Corpora in language assessment: An overview FASS MR 2
    13.00-14.00 Shelley Staples: Using multidimensional analysis for language assessment FASS MR 2
    14.00-14.25 Tea & coffee break FASS Reception
    14.30-16.00 Vaclav Brezina: Corpus methods in language testing (practical session) LICA computer lab

     

    Vaclav Brezina is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University. He is the author of Statistics in Corpus Linguistics: A Practical Guide (CUP) and a number of corpus analysis such as #LancsBox.

    Dana Gablasova is a Lecturer at the Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University, specialising in application of corpora and corpus methods in language learning, teaching and testing.

    Shelley Staples is an Associate Professor at the Department of English at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on the use of corpus-based discourse analysis (qualitative and quantitative computational text analysis) to investigate language use across spoken and written contexts. Her research using corpora for language testing purposes appeared in journals such as Language Testing and The Modern Language Journal.

    Acknowledgement: The workshop was supported by ESRC Strategic Investments – International Networking grant (ref. ES/R008906/1).

     

  • Sat
    09
    Mar
    2019
    10.30-3.30pmSt Nicholas Arcades, Lancaster [opposite HMV and in between Alex and Ryman]

    Come along to talk to linguists from Lancaster University about how computers can be used to analyse language. In particular, we will be looking at gender in spoken language using BNClab, a brand new online tool developed at Lancaster University.

    Conveners: Dr. Vaclav Brezina and Dr. Dana Gablasova

    Team: Raffaella Bottini, Irene Marin Cervantes, David Ellis, Lorrae Fox, Yejin Jung and Tanjun Liu

  • Thu
    21
    Mar
    2019
    Fri
    22
    Mar
    2019
    Australian National University in Canberra

    On 21-22 March 2019, we will run a free Corpus Linguistics workshop at the Australian National University in Canberra.

    For details, see here: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/corpus-linguistics-workshop-tickets-56163754301

  • Fri
    22
    Mar
    2019
    10.30-3.30pmSt Nicholas Arcades, Lancaster [opposite HMV and in between Alex and Ryman]

    Come along to talk to linguists from Lancaster University about how computers can be used to analyse language. In particular, we will be looking at gender in spoken language using BNClab, a brand new online tool developed at Lancaster University.

    Conveners: Dr. Vaclav Brezina and Dr. Dana Gablasova

    Team: Raffaella Bottini, Irene Marin Cervantes, David Ellis, Lorrae Fox, Yejin Jung and Tanjun Liu

  • Mon
    24
    Jun
    2019
    Thu
    27
    Jun
    2019
    Lancaster University

    Lancaster University is pleased to offer three free training events that cover the techniques of corpus linguistics and their application in three different areas.

    The schools include both lectures and practical sessions that introduce the latest developments in the field and practical applications of cutting-edge analytical techniques. The summer schools are taught by leading experts in the field from Lancaster University.

    More details: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/corpussummerschools/

    Applications will open in January 2019.

  • Fri
    28
    Jun
    2019
    1.30 - 5.15pmLancaster University, Lancaster, UK

    Symposium

    Encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s Language Symposium

    On the afternoon of Friday 28th June, the day after the Lancaster Summer Schools in Corpus Linguistics finish, the Encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s Language Project (funded by the AHRC), affiliated to CASS, will host a special half-day symposium to celebrate the upcoming public release of their resources.

    We are delighted to announce that the world-renowned English language scholar, Prof. David Crystal will give the opening address on language and Shakespeare. Furthermore, this will be followed by the leading architect of corpus linguistics, Prof. Tony McEnery, who will give a second opening address on historical language and corpus methods.

    Hear from the Project team who compiled various new and unique corpora to study Shakespeare’s language, along with tools and techniques for their analysis. The team will also present the findings of exciting and innovative research based on these resources. The first four talks are designed to display some of the research possibilities the resources afford, ranging from grammatical style through to gender in Shakespeare. The final talk reports the results of a spin-off project on the linguistic difficulties students experience when reading Shakespeare.

    All Summer Schools participants as well as any other interested parties are invited to attend this free event. Refreshments will be provided.

    Date: Friday 28th June 2019
    Time: 1.30 – 5.15pm
    Venue: Management School Lecture Theatre 5, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
    Programme: Programme including speakers and specific timings can be found below, or downloaded in PDF format here.
    Registration: Please register attendance for free here. The registration process ends on 25th June 2019 or when a maximum number of registrations is reached.

    Any queries can be directed to the symposium administrator, Mathew Gillings (m.gillings@lancaster.ac.uk).

    N.B.: This symposium is free to attend, but registration in advance is compulsory, as places are limited.

    Encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s Language Symposium programme (may be subject to minor changes)

    13:00 Arrival desk opens
    OPENING
    13:30 – 13:35 Welcome Jonathan Culpeper
    13:35 – 13:50 Opening address (1): Language and Shakespeare David Crystal
    13:50 – 14:05 Opening address (2): Historical language and corpus methods Tony McEnery
      NEW RESOURCES FOR INVESTIGATING SHAKESPEARE’S LANGUAGE
    14:05 – 14:25 New data for investigating Shakespeare’s language: The Shakespeare Corpus, The Comparative Corpus of Playwrights, The Comparative Multi-Genre EEBO Corpus Jonathan Culpeper, Andrew Hardie, Jane Demmen, Dawn Archer and Sean Murphy
    14:25 – 14:45 New tools and techniques for investigating Shakespeare’s language: CQPweb and spin-off interfaces Andrew Hardie, Amelia Joulain
    14:45 – 15:15 Break for refreshments
    CASE STUDIES
    15:15 – 15:35 Contemporary understandings of English and Celtic Identities: Characters in Shakespeare’s Henry V Jonathan Culpeper and Alison Findlay
    15:35 – 15:55 A Survey of grammatical variability in Early Modern English drama Andrew Hardie and Isolde van Dorst
    15:55 – 16:15 Women and men in Shakespeare Dawn Archer, Jane Demmen, Alison Findlay and Sean Murphy
    16:15 – 16:35 Depictions of deception, focussing on 10 Shakespearean Characters Dawn Archer and Mathew Gillings
    16:35 – 16:55 What do students find difficult when they read Shakespeare? Sean Murphy, Jonathan Culpeper and Mathew Gillings
    16:55 – 17:15 Finaly opportunity for questions and Symposium close Jonathan Culpeper and the project team
  • Mon
    01
    Jul
    2019
    10am-4.15pmThe Work Foundation, 21 Palmer Street, London

    This one-day workshop unites accounting researchers, financial market professionals, and experts in textual analysis with the goal of sharing views on the properties of high quality annual report narratives and the methods for analysing them. Enhanced practical understanding of the features shaping narrative reporting quality is critical for academic researchers interested in studying the phenomenon. Similarly, cutting-edge research in accounting affords insights into the text processing opportunities available to financial market professionals. Finally, both accounting researchers and professionals require guidance from linguistics and computer scientists on the practicalities of analysing text.

    The workshop programme comprises a novel combination of practice-focused sessions, research summaries, and introductions to aspects of natural language processing (NLP) and corpus linguistics for those new to the area. The workshop is supported by the Economic and Social Research Council, Lancaster University Management School, and the Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science.

  • Fri
    19
    Jul
    2019
    Sat
    20
    Jul
    2019
    Lancaster, UK

    The first of two events on "new methods and data in second language learning research." The first meeting takes place in Lancaster on 19th - 20th July and the second meeting takes place in Kobe, Japan on 28th - 29th September. In these events, we are bringing together researchers from second language research, psychology and corpus linguistics in order to enable the formation of new relationships between UK and Japanese researchers, strengthen existing links, identify common interests and develop common research agendas to enable future collaborative research.

    Attendance at the event is to a closed group and by invite only.

  • Sat
    28
    Sep
    2019
    Sun
    29
    Sep
    2019
    Kobe, Japan

    The second of two events on "new methods and data in second language learning research". The first meeting takes place in Lancaster on 19th - 20th July and the second meeting takes place in Kobe, Japan on 28th - 29th September. In these events, we are bringing together researchers from second language research, psychology and corpus linguistics in order to enable the formation of new relationships between UK and Japanese researchers, strengthen existing links, identify common interests and develop common research agendas to enable future collaborative research.

    Attendance at the event is to a closed group and by invite only.