Events

Event Information:

  • Thu
    07
    Mar
    2019

    Corpus-based approaches to language testing

    Lancaster University

    The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University is organising a free half-day workshop on corpus-based approaches to language testing. The event offers a combination of two lectures and a practical session. The practical session focuses on major corpus techniques used in language assessment research and practice. The workshop is suitable for students, researchers and practitioners interested in language assessment, applied linguistics and corpus methods. No prior knowledge of corpus linguistics is required.  We are delighted that Dr Shelley Staples from the University of Arizona accepted the invitation to give a guest lecture at the event.

    The attendance is free, but registration in advance is required since the number of places is limited. Registration is now closed.

    Follow the event on twitter from 12pm UK time @CorpusSocialSci 

    The handout for the practical session is available for download.

     

     

     

    Programme

    11.30-12.00 Registration & Lunch FASS Reception
    12.00-12.55 Dana Gablasova:  Corpora in language assessment: An overview FASS MR 2
    13.00-14.00 Shelley Staples: Using multidimensional analysis for language assessment FASS MR 2
    14.00-14.25 Tea & coffee break FASS Reception
    14.30-16.00 Vaclav Brezina: Corpus methods in language testing (practical session) LICA computer lab

     

    Vaclav Brezina is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University. He is the author of Statistics in Corpus Linguistics: A Practical Guide (CUP) and a number of corpus analysis such as #LancsBox.

    Dana Gablasova is a Lecturer at the Department of Linguistics and English Language, Lancaster University, specialising in application of corpora and corpus methods in language learning, teaching and testing.

    Shelley Staples is an Associate Professor at the Department of English at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on the use of corpus-based discourse analysis (qualitative and quantitative computational text analysis) to investigate language use across spoken and written contexts. Her research using corpora for language testing purposes appeared in journals such as Language Testing and The Modern Language Journal.

    Acknowledgement: The workshop was supported by ESRC Strategic Investments – International Networking grant (ref. ES/R008906/1).