TLC and innovation in language testing

One of the objectives of Trinity College London investing in the Trinity Lancaster Spoken Corpus has been to share findings with the language assessment community. The corpus allows us to develop an innovative approach to validating test constructs and offers a window into the exam room so we can see how test takers utilise their language skills in managing the series of test tasks.

Recent work by the CASS team in Lancaster has thrown up a variety of features that illustrate how test takers voice their identity in the test, how they manage interaction through a range of strategic competences and how they use epistemic markers to express their point of view and negotiate a relationship with the examiner (for more information see Gablasova et al. 2015). I have spent the last few months disseminating these findings at a range of language testing conferences and have found that the audiences have been fascinated by the findings.

We have presented findings at BAAL TEASIG in Reading, at EAQUALS in Lisbon  and at EALTA in Valencia. Audiences ranged from assessment experts to teacher educators and classroom practitioners and there was great interest both in how the test takers manage the exam as well as the manifestations of L2 language. Each presentation was tailored to the audience and the theme of the conference. In separate presentations, we covered how assessments can inform classroom practice, how the data could inform the type of feedback we give learners and how the data can be used to help validate aspects of the test construct. The feedback has been very positive, urging us to investigate further. Comments have praised the extent and quality of the corpus and range from the fact that the evidence “is something that we have long been waiting for” (Dr Parvaneh Tavakoli, University of Reading) to musings on what some of the data might mean both for how we assess spoken language and the implications for the classroom. It has certainly opened the door on the importance of strategic and pragmatic competences as well as validating Trinity’s aims to allow the test taker to bring themselves into the test.  The excitement spilled over into some great tweets. There is general recognition that the data offers something new – sometimes confirming what we suspected and sometimes – as with all corpora – refuting our beliefs!

We have always recognised that the data is constrained by the semi-formal context of the test but the fact that each test is structured but not scripted and has tasks which represent language pertinent to communicative events in the wider world allows the test taker to produce language which is more reflective of naturally occurring speech than many other oral tests. It has been enormously helpful to have feedback from the audiences who have fully engaged with the issues raised and highlighted aspects we can investigate in greater depth as well as raising features they would like to know more about. These features are precisely those that the research team wishes to explore in order to develop ‘a more fine-grained and comprehensive understanding of spoken pragmatic ability and communicative competence’ (Gablasova et al. 2015: 21)

One of the next steps is to show how this data can be used to develop and support performance descriptors. Trinity is confident that the features of communication which the test takers display are captured in its new Integrated Skills in English exam validating claims that Trinity assesses real world communication.

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