Upcoming CASS Psycholinguistics Seminar

CASS is excited to announce an upcoming half-day research seminar on the theme of “Corpus Data and Psycholinguistics”. The event will take place on Thursday 19th May 2016 at 1-5pm in Furness Lecture Theatre 3.

The aim of the event is to bring together researchers with an interest in combining methods from corpus linguistics and psycholinguistics. In particular, there will be a focus on experimental psycholinguistics. It is set to be an exciting afternoon consisting of four 40-minute presentations from both internal and external speakers. Professor Padraic Monaghan from the Department of Psychology will be giving an introduction to computational modelling in psycholinguistics, and I will be presenting my work on investigating the processing of collocation using EEG. Furthermore, Dr Phil Durrant from the University of Exeter will be giving a talk entitled “Revisiting collocational priming”, and Professor Michaela Mahlberg from the University of Birmingham will be discussing the methodological issues associated with combining eye-tracking techniques with corpus data.

You can find out more about these talks from the abstracts below.


Padraic Monaghan, Lancaster University

Computational modelling of corpus data in psycholinguistic studies

Computational models of language learning and processing enable us to determine the inherent structure present in language input, and also the cognitive mechanisms that react to this structure. I will give an introduction to computational models used in psycholinguistic studies, with a particular focus on connectionist models where the structure of processing is derived principally from the structure of the input to the model.


Phil Durrant, University of Exeter

Revisiting collocational priming

Durrant & Doherty (2010) evaluated whether collocations at different levels of frequency exhibit psycholinguistic priming. It also attempted to untangle collocation from the related phenomenon of psychological association by comparing collocations which were and were not associates. Priming was found between high-frequency collocations but associated collocates appeared to exhibit more deep-rooted priming (as reflected in a task designed to reflect automatic, rather than strategic processes) than those which were not associated. This presentation will critically review the 2010 paper in light of more recent work. It will re-evaluate the study itself and suggest ways in which research could be taken forward.

Durrant, P., & Doherty, A. (2010). Are high-frequency collocations psychologically real? Investigating the thesis of collocational priming. Corpus linguistics and linguistic theory, 6(2), 125-155.


Jennifer Hughes, Lancaster University

Investigating the processing of collocation using EEG: A pilot study

In this presentation, I discuss the results of an EEG experiment which pilots a procedure for determining whether or not there is a quantitively distinct brain response to the processing of collocational bigrams compared to non-collocational bigrams. Collocational bigrams are defined as adjacent word pairs which have a high forward transitional probability in the BNC (e.g. crucial point), while non-collocational bigrams are defined as adjacent word pairs which are semantically plausible but are absent from the BNC (e.g. crucial night). The results show that there is a neurophysiological difference in how collocational bigrams and non-collocations bigrams are processed.


Michaela Mahlberg, Kathy Conklin, and Gareth Carrol, University of Birmingham

Exploring corpus-attested patterns in Dickens’s fiction – methodological challenges of using eye-tracking techniques

The study of the relationship between patterns and meanings is a key concern in corpus linguistics. The data that corpus linguists work with, however, only provides a partial picture. In this paper, we will look at how questions of frequencies in corpora can be related to questions raised by data from eye-tracking studies on reading times. We will also discuss challenges of designing experiments to address these questions. As a case study, we focus on examples of patterns identified in Dickens’s fiction, but the methodological issues we address have wider implications beyond the study of literary corpora.


The event is free to attend and is open to both internal and external attendees. If you are an external guest, please email j.j.hughes(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)lancaster.ac.uk so we know that you intend to come.

We are really looking forward to this event as it will be an exciting opportunity to share ideas regarding the different approaches to using corpus data in experimental psycholinguistics.

FireAnt is making headlines!

FireAnt, a tool for extracting, visualising and exporting social media data, is making headlines! The tool, developed by Claire Hardaker and Laurence Anthony at CASS, has been noted by the Daily Mail for it’s abilities to “hunt down terrorists and trolls”. We’re delighted that FireAnt is being recognised for its capabilities in social media data analysis, and that this is being illustrated to the public in mainstream news.

You can read the article here.

You can read more about FireAnt and it’s development here and here.

News: Professor John Urry

CASS is extremely sorry to hear of the death of Professor John Urry. We have lost a very distinguished and enthusiastic member of our team, and he will be greatly missed by all at the centre. You can read more about John’s life and work here.

CASS PhD Student Awarded Gale Dissertation Research Fellowship!

CASS is delighted that the Gale Dissertation Research Fellowship for research to be undertaken in 2016 has been awarded to Amelia Joulain-Jay, a PhD student at CASS, for her work on using Geographical Information Systems and Corpus Linguistics methods to investigate how places were represented in nineteenth-century British newspapers.

The Gale Dissertation Research Fellowship is awarded byThe Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP) in support of dissertation research that makes substantial use of full-text digitized collections of 19th-century British magazines and newspapers. The Fellowship aims to support historical and literary research that deepens our understanding of the 19th-century British press in all its rich variety, and also encourages the scholarly use of collections of full-text digital facsimiles of these primary sources in aid of that research.  A prize of $1500 will be awarded, together with one year’s passworded subscription to selected digital collections from Gale, including 19th Century UK Periodicals and 19th Century British Library Newspapers.

Congratulations to CASS ‘s Professor Ram-Prasad

Congratulations to CASS ‘s Professor Ram-Prasad who has been announced as the winner of the ‘Best Book in Hindu-Christian Studies (2011-2015)’ book ‘Divine Self, Human Self: The Philosophy of Being in Two Gita Commentaries’ (Bloomsbury, 2013).  The Society for Hindu-Christian Studies will hold a panel discussion of Professor Ram-Prasad’s book at the November 2016 annual meeting in San Antonio.

Syntactic structures in the Trinity Lancaster Corpus

We are proud to announce collaboration with Markus Dickinson and Paul Richards from the Department of Linguistics, Indiana University on a project  that will analyse syntactic structures in the Trinity Lancaster Corpus. The focus of the project is to develop a syntactic annotation scheme of spoken learner language and apply this scheme to the Trinity Lancaster Corpus, which is being compiled at Lancaster University in collaboration with Trinity College London. The aim of the project is to provide an annotation layer for the corpus that will allow sophisticated exploration of the morphosyntactic and syntactic structures in learner speech. The project will have an impact on both the theoretical understanding of spoken language production at different proficiency levels as well as on the development of practical NLP solutions for annotation of learner speech.  More specific goals include:

  • Identification of units of spoken production and their automatic recognition.
  • Annotation and visualization of morphosyntactic and syntactic structures in learner speech.
  • Contribution to the development of syntactic complexity measures for learner speech.
  • Description of the syntactic development of spoken learner production.

 

What’s wrong with “a bunch of migrants”? Looking at the linguistic evidence

This week at Prime Minister’s Questions, David Cameron used the term “a bunch of migrants to describe refugees at a camp in Calais. He was subsequently criticised by Labour MPs and members of the general public on Twitter, and the story was reported on in mainstream newspapers like the Guardian and the Telegraph. Critics described his comments as “dehumanising”, “callous” and “inflammatory”.

Something about David Cameron saying the words “bunch of” to describe a group of people caused a furore – but what was it? Is this how people normally use this phrase, or is this a noteworthy departure from the norm?

Here at CASS we have the unique opportunity to analyse a very large set of everyday conversations between speakers of British English from all over the UK, which participants have been recording in their homes and sending to us to be transcribed. Using the transcriptions, we can use computer software to analyse how words and phrases are used commonly across the entire country.

I searched through 4.5 million words of present day conversation to find out how people in the UK normally use the phrase “bunch of”. I found that “people”, “flowers” and “things” are the most likely words to be described in this way. Beyond this, there are several other words which refer to groups of people:

“kids”, “volunteers”, “retards”, “losers”, “lads”, “individuals”, “friends”, “dickheads”, “dancers”, “Aussies”, “alcoholics”, “thieving sods” and “thieving fuckers”.

Absent from this list is the word “migrants”, which does not occur in this context. The evidence suggests that people do often use “bunch of” to describe groups of people negatively or with distaste. Therefore the upset caused by Cameron’s use of the phrase “a bunch of migrants” is perhaps understandable.

We are still collecting recordings from speakers all over the UK. For information on how to contribute to this project, which is led by Lancaster University and Cambridge University Press, please visit the Spoken BNC2014 website.

FireAnt Launch Event

We will be running a launch event and workshop for a new software tool that we have created called FireAnt. The event and workshop will be held from 13:00 to 17:00 on Monday 22nd February 2016 here at Lancaster University.

FireAnt was created by Laurence Anthony as part of the 2015 ESRC-funded CASS-affiliated DOOM project on social media analysis. FireAnt is a free and easy-to-use tool designed to help corpus linguists and social scientists analyze Twitter and other social network data without the need for programming or database management skills. The following features of the tool will be explored in this workshop:

  • import different formats of data (e.g. Twitter data in JSON format, Reddit data in CSV format, etc.)
  • search that data and its associated metadata in a variety of ways (e.g., retrieve all tweets containing #blacklivesmatter sent in December 2015)
  • export the results to other formats including a plain text file for “standard” corpus analysis, an Excel/CSV file for statistical analysis, a timeline chart, and a network graph

We will be providing lunch at the start of the event and all materials for the workshop (including the software and help guide) on a USB drive. The schedule for the day can be found below.

SCHEDULE

Time Agenda
1315-1415 PDR Room: Lunch
1415-1430 Introduction, log on, etc.
1430-1530 FireAnt basics
1530-1545 Refuel: Coffee break
1545-1645 FireAnt advanced
1645-1700 Q&As, requests, bouquets, encores

Please note that places are extremely limited and must be booked in advance. If you would like to attend, please email Claire Hardaker (c.hardaker(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)lancaster.ac.uk) in the first instance.

Welcome Jens Zinn – Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow

Jens ZinnCASS is delighted to welcome Jens Zinn to the centre after being awarded a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship! This is an extremely prestigious award, named after the double Nobel Prize winning Polish-French scientist famed for her work on radioactivity. The fellowships support outstanding scholars at all stages of their careers, irrespective of nationality.

Jens has studied and taught at many universities in Germany, and in 2009 he was appointed Associate Professor and Reader in Sociology at The University of Melbourne. Jens has founded a number of international research networks on the Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty (SoRU). The joint internet portal of these groups is open to everyone to contribute to current debates and ongoing activities. His research activities include a number of studies on people’s management of risk and uncertainty during the course of their life (e.g. youth transitions into the labour market; certainty constructions in reflexive modernity; British veteran’s management of risk and uncertainty). He led a collaborative research initiative ‘Risk, Social Inclusion and the Life Course – A Social Policy Perspective’ at the University of Melbourne and a research project ‘Decision Taking in Times of Uncertainty. Towards an efficient strategy to manage risk and uncertainty in climate change adaptation’ funded by the Victorian Centre for Climate Change Adaptation Research. Most recently he has worked with Daniel Mcdonald on a project examining the change of the risk semantic in the New York Times from an historical perspective combining corpus linguistics with sociology.

Here at CASS, Jens will be working with Professor Tony McEnery on a project which aims to advance our understanding of the forces that have driven the proliferation of risk discourses in the UK and Germany since World War Two. Working at the boundaries of risk sociology and corpus linguistics, this is a highly innovative enterprise, both theoretically and methodologically. It will examine the contribution made by main-stream risk theories to explaining the increasing use of the risk semantic in media coverage during the last 50 years, and it will develop an empirically grounded theory of the observable shift towards risk. Jens will utilise cutting-edge corpus-based research strategies to systematically reconstruct the changing use of the discourse-semantics of risk and will complement these with interviews of media experts to examine how these changes are linked to institutional and socio-cultural changes and historically significant events.

CASS would like to congratulate Jens on securing this highly esteemed fellowship, and we are very much looking forward to working with Jens on this exciting project!

Check back soon for more updates!

Workshop on Corpus Linguistics in Ghana

Back in 2014, a team from CASS ran a well-received introductory workshop on Corpus Linguistics in Accra, Ghana – a country where Lancaster University has a number of longstanding academic partnerships and has recently established a campus.

We’re pleased to announce that in February of this year, we will be returning to Ghana and running two more introductory one-day events. Both events are free to attend, each consisting of a series of introductory lectures and practical sessions on topics in corpus linguistics and the use of corpus tools.

Since the 2014 workshop was attended by some participants from a long way away, this time we are running events in two different locations in Ghana. The first workshop, on Tuesday 23rd February 2016, will be in Cape Coast, organised jointly with the University of Cape Coast: click this link for details. The second workshop, on  Friday 26th February 2016, will be in Legon (nr. Accra), organised jointly with the University of Ghana: click this link for details. The same material will be covered at both workshops.

The workshop in 2014 was built largely around the use of our online corpus tools, particularly CQPweb. In the 2016 events, we’re going to focus instead on a pair of programs that you can run on your own computer to analyse your own data: AntConc and GraphColl. For that reason we will be encouraging participants who have their own corpora to bring them along to analyse in the workshop. These can be in any language – not just English! Don’t worry however – we will also provide sample datasets that participants who don’t have their own data can work with.

We invite anyone in Ghana who wants to learn more about the versatile methodology for language analysis that is corpus linguistics to attend! While the events are free, registration in advance is required, as places are limited.