Questioning Vaccination Discourse (Quo VaDis): A Corpus-based Study

A new three-year project based in CASS will use corpus linguistic methods to study how vaccinations (including future vaccines for Covid-19) are talked about in the UK press, UK parliamentary discourse and social media. Through collaborations with governmental and public health partners, the findings will be used to help address vaccine hesitancy, which is one of the World Health Organizations top 10 global health challenges.

The project will start in March 2021 and is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, part of UK Research and Innovation.

To find out more, read Lancaster University’s announcement and watch a brief introduction to the project by Principal Investigator Elena Semino.

English language assessment and training for medical professionals

Proficiency in English is crucial for effective and appropriate medical communication and U.K. regulating bodies for nurse and doctor practitioners use standardised tests (such as IELTS, OET, TOEFL) to assess English proficiency of non-UK/EU applicants.

The aim of this project is to investigate a corpus of authentic clinical interactions to identify patterns of interaction and language used by health professionals and as such, determine how well the English tests taken by applicants reflect English as used in ‘real life’ encounters. Our investigation will help us to identify the key communication skills required to deliver effective clinical care and allow us to support industrial partners with specific recommendations for language assessment and training for healthcare staff.

With a broad focus on the various participant roles within the patient journey through Emergency Departments, we are investigating how the language used by patients, nurses, doctors and other hospital staff reflects their various responsibilities and status. Specifically, we focus on the following aspects of language: –

Questions: which participants ask questions throughout the encounter? How are they phrased and to what do they refer? How do health professionals check understanding?

Directives: how do health professionals issue instructions? What types of mitigation or hedging are used?

Openings: how do the participants introduce themselves and establish their roles? Do health professionals use names/titles?

Pronouns: how do participants establish and maintain individual/collective identities through the use of pronouns?

Small talk: how and when do health professionals engage in small talk with patients? Or with other health professionals?

Empathy: how do we evidence expressions of empathy in the data? What kinds of empathy phrases do we observe and does this differ according to role?

Our approach is designed to identify those recurring interactional features of Emergency Department encounters that can help inform the teaching and assessment procedures that prepare candidates for the ‘real world’ of healthcare communication.

Team

Dr Dana Gablasova (https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/dana-gablasova) (Lead Investigator)

Dr Luke Collins (https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/luke-collins) (Senior Research Associate)

Dr Vaclav Brezina (https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/vaclav-brezina) (Co-Investigator)

Dr John Pill (https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/linguistics/about/people/john-pill) (Co-Investigator)

Introductory Blog – Luke Collins

I am delighted to have joined the CASS team as Senior Research Associate and will be working across the new programme of studies in Corpus Approaches to Health(care) Communication. I have already begun working on a fascinating strand exploring the Narratives of Voice-hearers and I will be working closely with Professor Elena Semino in applying corpus methods to see what effects a therapeutic intervention has on the experiences of those who hear distressing voices – and how they articulate these experiences – over time. More broadly, we will be examining representations of mental health and illness in the media, looking to address issues of stigmatisation and support public awareness and understanding.

Working towards the application of corpus linguistics and the findings of corpus analysis to health services is a great motivation to me and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to build on my previous work in this area. I have published work on the experiences of people undergoing a therapeutic intervention and demonstrated how corpus approaches can help to capture some of the complexities of those experiences. I have also implemented corpus analyses to investigate discussions of complex global issues in the news media (specifically, climate change and AMR), thinking about public understanding and how media reporting can help readers to comprehend their role in such issues. I have recently been working on my edition of the Routledge ‘Corpus Linguistics for..’ series, focusing on applications of corpus tools for analysing different types of online communication and hope to announce its release early next year. Throughout my work, I have endeavoured to raise awareness of corpus methods outside of the discipline and create opportunities to work with collaborators from various backgrounds. I am glad to find that in my role with CASS, this can continue!

Outside of my work, I have a reputation for hand-made greeting cards and I am an avid record collector. Since I have moved to Lancaster I have been exploring the local area and discovering what a picturesque part of the country this is. I don’t even mind the rain!